A PolaWalk in Deep Ellum / 8×10 Portraits with the Instant Film Society

January 28, 2013 § 4 Comments

This past weekend, The Instant Film Society hosted, what was more than likely, the largest gathering of instant film enthusiasts in the state of Texas.  More than fifty photographers and lovers of instant film gathered at Makeshift Photography‘s studio in Deep Ellum to participate in a PolaWalk and also have their portraits taken on Impossible’s 8×10 film.

Photo: Justin Goode - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

A couple of days before the event, I spent a little time with Steve Reeves, Troy Bradford & Tyler Tyndell at Steve’s studio to get some things organized for this.  We met up to talk 8×10 photography, get things set in place for Saturday’s PolaWalk and tested out a few things before we parted ways for the night.  While we were there, we decided it would probably be best if we went ahead and knocked out a couple of the portraits before we had the rush of people that we were expecting on Saturday.  Tyler took some great BTS photos of our meet up that evening.

Impossible Project 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible Project 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Impossible Project 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible Project 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell

Photo: Tyler Tyndell - Polaroid 1200 Cinema Film

Photo: Tyler Tyndell – Polaroid 1200 Cinema Film

When I woke up on Saturday morning, I was excited beyond belief.  I couldn’t wait to get into the studio to set up for this particular PolaWalk.  We’ve hosted quite a few since the Instant Film Society was founded, but nothing up to this point, had been as highly anticipated as this particular event.   The lure of 8×10 cameras and large format instant film was creating quite a buzz within the photography community.  About two weeks ago, I shot 8×10 instant film for the first time and immediately fell in love with the medium.  It’s simply incredible.  There’s nothing else like it out there in the market place and it’s quite honestly a rarity in a sense.  At this point in time, only one company makes it and because of the high cost of materials & tools needed, most photographers don’t ever get a chance to see it or use it.  Giving that opportunity to the D/FW instant community was something I was really looking forward to helping provide.

When Synthia and I got to MakeShift Photography’s studio on the day of the PolaWalk, Steve & Erin were prepping for the event and all of us were eager to get things started.  Friends of ours started to trickle into the studio and within an hour or so, we were all gearing up for a busy day.  I had split the 8×10 photo shoots up into two groups so it wouldn’t be too incredibly busy while we worked and by the time 3 o’clock rolled around, the studio was packed.  Steve had his Toyo View 8×10 set up on one side of the studio utilizing a “blackground” and I was set up on the other side with my Burke & James Grover shooting towards a blank wall.  Erin was loading up the 8×10 Polaroid holders and running the processor all afternoon and Synthia was scanning the 8×10’s, peeling the images and hanging them up to dry.  It was definitely a group effort to get this whole shabang running quickly & smoothly.

When most of the participants had arrived, Daniel Rodrigue took the first group out to walk around Deep Ellum while the rest of us stuck around to start with 8×10 portraits.  It was such a cool thing to be able to give this opportunity to these fellow photographers.  I assume most hadn’t seen an 8×10 camera before.  Everyone it seemed was just in awe of the process and I could tell were all stoked to have the chance to learn about this special way of creating images.

All in all, I think we ended up taking about 25+ 8×10 images and the ones who were photographed were thrilled to have an instant 8×10 portrait of their own.  Attached are some of my personal favorites from our time at the studio …

Photo: Tyler Tyndell - Impossible Project PX-100

Photo: Tyler Tyndell – Impossible Project PX-100

Photo: Tyler Tyndell - Polaroid 1200 Cinema Film

Photo: Tyler Tyndell – Polaroid 1200 Cinema Film

Photo: Richard Kacprowski - Polaroid SLR 680 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Richard Kacprowski – Polaroid SLR 680 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Richard Kacprowski - Polaroid SLR 680 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Richard Kacprowski – Polaroid SLR 680 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Richard Kacprowski - Polaroid SLR 680 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Richard Kacprowski – Polaroid SLR 680 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Toyo View

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Toyo View

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Toyo View

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Toyo View

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Toyo View

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Toyo View

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

A couple of friends of mine, Daniel Poe & Matthew Hogan were there at this event and I did let them take over and rearrange the setup for their images.  These guys are brilliant with off-camera flash and there was no way I was going to pass up an opportunity to watch them work.  They quickly rearranged the octabox & stripboxes for their portraits and when I took the test images on the “digi-roid”, I knew they had crafted something nice …

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8x10 PQ - Burke & James Grover

Impossible 8×10 PQ – Burke & James Grover

Photo: Scott Mitchell - Polaroid 180 - Fuji FP-3000B

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid 180 – Fuji FP-3000B

Photo: RJ Connele

Photo: RJ Connole

Photo: RJ Connele

Photo: RJ Connole

Photo: RJ Connele

Photo: RJ Connole

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 250 - Fuji FP-3000B

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 250 – Fuji FP-3000B

Because I was in the studio all day, I never had the chance to go out and shoot with the rest of the group that was wandering around Deep Ellum.  It was really cool to see all of the great images that flooded into my inbox on Sunday. Here’s a handful of images from the PolaWalk portion of this event …

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid 600SE - Polaroid 669

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid 600SE – Polaroid 669

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid 600SE - Polaroid 669

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid 600SE – Polaroid 669

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Softtone

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Softtone

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Softtone

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Softtone

Photo: Tyler Tyndell - Polaroid Spectra SE -1200 Cinema

Photo: Tyler Tyndell – Polaroid Spectra SE – 1200 Cinema

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: RJ Connele

Photo: RJ Connole

Photo: Jama Plotts - Polaroid 250 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Jama Plotts – Polaroid 250 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Jama Plotts - Polaroid 250 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Jama Plotts – Polaroid 250 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Polaroid SLR 680 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Polaroid SLR 680 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: CJ Mejia - Polaroid 220 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: CJ Mejia – Polaroid 220 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: CJ Mejia - Polaroid 220 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: CJ Mejia – Polaroid 220 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Polaroid SLR 680 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Polaroid SLR 680 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Polaroid SLR 680 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Polaroid SLR 680 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Nancy Stockdale - Polaroid SX-70 - Polaroid Time Zero

Photo: Nancy Stockdale – Polaroid SX-70 – Polaroid Time Zero

Photo: Kyle Vaughn - Impossible Project PZ-680 CP

Photo: Kyle Vaughn – Impossible Project PZ-680 CP

Photo: Kyle Vaughn - Impossible Project PX-680 Gold Frame

Photo: Kyle Vaughn – Impossible Project PX-680 Gold Frame

Photo: Amanda Potter - Polaroid Spectra - PZ-680 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter – Polaroid Spectra – PZ-680 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter - Polaroid Spectra - PZ-680 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter – Polaroid Spectra – PZ-680 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter - Polaroid Spectra - PZ-680 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter – Polaroid Spectra – PZ-680 CP

Photo: Jeremy Hughes - Polaroid Spectra - PZ-680 CP

Photo: Jeremy Hughes – Polaroid Spectra – PZ-680 CP

Photo: Jeremy Hughes - Polaroid Spectra - PZ-680 CP

Photo: Jeremy Hughes – Polaroid Spectra – PZ-680 CP

Photo: Scott Mitchell - Polaroid 180 - Fuji FP-3000B

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid 180 – Fuji FP-3000B

Photo: Kathy Tran - Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Kathy Tran – Fuji Instax Wide

I haven’t mentioned this on my blog yet,  but I was interviewed last week by the local ABC news affiliate, WFAA – Channel 8, for a story they are doing on people who choose older forms of technology even when newer more advanced technologies are available.  One of the reporters was with the group on Saturday to tape our PolaWalk and ended up interviewing a lot of the participants.  After he recorded all of this great footage, Ryan came up to me and told me that they were probably going to do a separate story on our event in addition to the one I was going to be featured in.  That’s exciting.  It’s promotion for The Instant Film Society and more promotion for instant film in general.

I’m still a little stunned that we had around fifty photographers and instant film enthusiasts join us this past weekend.  It’s a testament to the work we’ve been doing for months around the metroplex promoting instant film.  On Sunday, when I created the new event page for our upcoming PolaWalk at Klyde Warren Park in February, within 24 hours, we had 30+ people who had signed up to join us.   This special community of instant photographers is growing exponentially and I’m really excited to see how it will progress over the next year.

-Justin

http://www.instantfilmsociety.com

http://www.goodephotography.biz

CLICK HERE to learn how to get into instant photography

CLICK HERE to learn more about The Impossible Project

A PolaWalk in Sundance Square

December 18, 2012 § Leave a comment

This past Saturday, the Instant Film Society was at it again storming the streets with our Polaroids in hand.  I’ve started to organize monthly meet ups around the D/FW area to help promote and encourage the use of instant film.  While doing so, I’ve met an incredible amount of talented and passionate people that enjoy instant photography.   Besides the ones that were already into it, I’ve helped a lot of my friends get their feet wet and most if not all, LOVE it.  The tangible instant gratification is something that I think appeals to everyone that tries it out.

The weather on the day of was perfect.  You really couldn’t have asked for better weather.  It was slightly overcast and 70 degrees … in December.   You’ve got to love Texas.  Anyhow, I cruised out to Ft. Worth with my friend Jama and we ended up making it out there a little early.  Made our way over to the The Flying Saucer (the meet up spot) and I saw Troy B. making his way towards us.   I’ve interacted with Troy online quite a few times, but this was the first time he was able to attend one of these events with us.   Long story short, he’s a super nice guy and his presence was definitely a bonus.   We instantly started gabbing all things photography and clicked off the bat.  By this time, Annie, another person I’d met online, showed up and you could tell that she was happy to be there amongst like-minded peeps.   Come to think of it, most of the people that came to this particular walk were new to the group and had not been to a previous one.   For me, that’s really encouraging.  It means that this positive vibe I’m throwing out there, into the world about instant photography, is working.   I truly believe the world reciprocates positivity when you give it the same.  That seems to be happening with the Instant Film Society.  I couldn’t be happier.

We waited around for the rest of the group to show up while talking shop with each other.  Richard, who was at our first event, joined up with us and I’m so glad he came back.  His energy is palpable and he’s so much fun to be around.  My good friend Justin V. (JV) and his son Callum showed up .. which was awesome.  Amanda P., this super nice girl I’d met online who’s working on a long term photo project (Impossibly Expired) came to the walk too and ended up loaning Callum a SX-70 and a pack of film to shoot with!  Anyhow,  JV later said that seeing Callum’s eyes at that moment was the highlight of his night.  🙂  RJ, a fellow film lover that I had met online was there.  Amy, my good friend that has dove head first into Polaroid cruised out too.  Laidric, one of the now regulars in our group came out again.  He’s always fun to hang around with. Jessica H., a girl that knows one of my best friends, showed up with one of her friends (I forgot your name  .. sorry!)  Annie, whom I mentioned earlier, got me in touch with two photographers, Steve & Erin, who are into vintage cameras a few weeks ago and they of course showed up too!  Last but certainly not least, Christian, Elaine and a group of their family/friends met up with us as well.  Christian is a big promoter of instant film around his neck of the woods and has been to every event we’ve had.   I just can’t say enough just how cool all of these people are and how much I enjoy their company.  Alright, enough with the role call …

This walk, was mainly geared towards shooting instant film at night and shooting long exposures.  We had about an hour of light before the sun set when we began.  As things got darker, most used tripods to help steady their exposures during this PolaWalk.  One of the things I love about photography and also hosting these events, is that I get to see and share unique perspectives from a variety of instant photographers.  From beginners to professionals, each have their own approach in how they see and capture the subject which is reflected in these images.

Enjoy a healthy mix of Impossible Project, expired Polaroid, and Fuji peel-apart images …

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid Spectra - PZ600 Black Frame

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ600 Black Frame

Photo: Jama Plotts - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Jama Plotts – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Annie Donovan - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Annie Donovan – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Amanda Potter - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Erin Curry - Polaroid SX-70 Sonar - Impossible Project PX-100 Old Gen

Photo: Erin Curry – Polaroid SX-70 Sonar – Impossible Project PX-100 Old Gen

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 250 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 250 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Jama Plotts - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Jama Plotts – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Justin Goode - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid 690

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid Land Camera – Polaroid 690

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid 690

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid Land Camera – Polaroid 690

Photo: Troy Bradford - Polaroid SX-70 - Imposible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Troy Bradford – Polaroid SX-70 – Imposible Project PX-70

Photo: Amanda Potter - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Amanda Potter – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Steve Reeves - Polaroid 600SE - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Steve Reeves – Polaroid 600SE – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Erin Curry - Polaroid SX-70 Sonar - Impossible Project PX-100 Old Gen

Photo: Erin Curry – Polaroid SX-70 Sonar – Impossible Project PX-100 Old Gen

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 250 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 250 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Annie Donovan - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Annie Donovan – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Annie Donovan - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Annie Donovan – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Annie Donovan - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Annie Donovan – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ600

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 250 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 250 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Callum Vinson - Polaroid Rainbow SX-70 - EXPIRED PX-70

Photo: Callum Vinson – Polaroid Rainbow SX-70 – EXPIRED PX-70

Photo: Jama Plotts - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Jama Plotts – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 CP

Photo: Elaine Rios Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Elaine Rios – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Elaine Rios Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Elaine Rios Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP

Photo: Justin Vinson - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Justin Vinson – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Polaroid Alpha SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP + ND

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid Alpha SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP + ND

Photo: Christian Oliviera - Polaroid Alpha SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP + ND

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid Alpha SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP + ND

Photo: Christian Oliviera - Polaroid Alpha SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-680 CP + ND

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid Alpha SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-680 CP + ND

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Polaroid Spectra Pro - Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Polaroid Spectra Pro – Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Polaroid Spectra Pro - Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Polaroid Spectra Pro – Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Jama Plotts - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Jama Plotts – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Polaroid Spectra Pro - Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Polaroid Spectra Pro – Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Justin Vinson - Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Justin Vinson – Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ680 CP

Photo: Justin Goode - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Justin Goode – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

At the end of the night, a group of us met back up at The Flying Saucer and grabbed a few beers while talking about all things photography.   Steve set up his Polaroid 600SE and snapped a couple of long exposures on his Polaroid using Fuji’s FP-100C.  The following exposures were set up from the area we were hanging out at, exposed for 30 minutes due to the reciprocity failure of the film and were, as Steve said, “fueled by a Left Hand Milk Stout” 🙂

Photo: Steve Reeves - Polaroid 600SE - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Steve Reeves – Polaroid 600SE – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Steve Reeves - Polaroid 600SE - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Steve Reeves – Polaroid 600SE – Fuji FP-100C

Are you interested in joining us for our next PolaWalk?  We’ll be shooting around Deep Ellum in Dallas, TX on January 26th.  If you’d like more info, you can find it here.

Twitter user? Follow us: @UseInstantFilm

As always, thanks for reading.

-Justin

www.instantfilmsociety.com

www.goodephotography.biz

Spreadin’ the love of Impossible Project Film at Brookhaven College

October 5, 2012 § 16 Comments

About a week ago, I got in contact with Daniel Rodrigue, the journalism & photography instructor at Brookhaven College.   He had seen a post about the PolaWalk that I was hosting at the State Fair and after a brief telephone conversation, we decided to meet up.   When we did, he and I instantly clicked.   We’re both like-minded individuals and the passion that we share for instant photography is one in the same.   During our meeting, he asked me if I would mind talking to his students at his Photography 1 class about instant film & The Impossible Project.  After some thought, I quickly agreed and it was decided that I’d meet with them the following Tuesday.

I messaged The Impossible Project and they were ecstatic that I had the opportunity to help spread the word about instant film and would send some promotional material for the students.  I was really excited for the students and also very grateful for the opportunity from Daniel.

I’m not a public speaker.  However, I’ve been inspired to talk a lot about this medium.  It’s moved me in a way that no other facet of photography has.   It’s incredibly unique and the company that provides it, is just as much.

Following my meeting with Daniel and my conversations with TIP, I wrote a three page introduction about the company and its films; history, how to use it, special techniques and finally, closed it with a little bit of motivation to help spread the word.

Tuesday came along and I was fully prepared with everything that was needed.   I had a handful of cameras to show & use, Impossible Project film, an emulsion/lift transfer kit with examples, cork boards filled with many of my favorites Impossible images and finally, the confidence needed to pull this off.   This was my FIRST public speaking event.   I would by lying if I said I wasn’t nervous.   I woke up very early that day and was hyping myself up all morning.   I knew I had the knowledge to give them, but more importantly, I hoped that some of the inspiration I’ve gotten from using instant film would rub off on them.

When I got to Brookhaven, Daniel was all smiles and very excited for his students.   I brought in my box of goodies, gave Daniel a poster from The Impossible Project and started organizing all of the material.  Students eventually started to make their way into class, and I could tell many of them were enthralled with some of the images I brought.   It made me happy and also was a little calming to see the excitement that was brewing.

Ten-thirty rolled around and I began the class.   I started off talking about why I like instant film, how it’s completely different than using digital and the ways it can help improve your skill set.  One of the main reasons I love instant film, is that it forces you to slow down.  When every shot really counts and burning images, like one does with digital isn’t an option, you think about EVERYTHING (light, exposure, composition, the development temperature, etc.)  You inherently become a better shooter because of this.  Doing this day in and day out, with every image you take, increases your awareness of what is needed for a successful image and improves on your ability to take great images.   Slowing down helps you to produce quality images a lot more frequently.

Teaching Brookhaven students about Impossible Project film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching Brookhaven students about Impossible Project film

Teaching Brookhaven students about various Polaroid cameras

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching Brookhaven students about various Polaroid cameras

I had an hour for this portion of the class and I was going to meet back up with the photography club at 3 o’clock to show them how to perform emulsion transfers & lifts.  At this point, I had talked and answered questions for about 20 minutes, shown them various cameras that I use, but I really wanted to get some cameras & film into the hands of these people.  Sometimes seeing & feeling what it’s like to shoot instant film, is what it really takes to push people past the tipping point.   I went over how to shield their images, how to shoot the camera and off they went!  The energy was palpable!

Armed with a handful of Polaroid One Steps, some PX-680 CP and PX600 film, the students ran outside and started snapping away!  Daniel and I raced around, trying to find the groups of budding photographers that were snapping off instant film as if it were going out of style.   Integral film was blazing out of these cameras.  It was a sight to see!  Many of the other students around campus were looking and I’m sure wondering “Why did I not take a photography class? Polaroids?!? ”  Strangers were walking up to Daniel asking him what was going on.  It was greatness!

Enjoy some of the images they took …

 – Students, if you would like credit for the images you took, please email me and describe which one/s are yours and I will add credit (first & last name) to your image – 

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Jennifer Chevallier

Photo: Jennifer Chevallier

Photo: Brian Finch

Photo: Brian Finch

Some of the images I took of the action …

Unfortunately, it was nearing the end of the hour and the students had to get to their next class.  We found most of them and regrouped for a quick photo.

I asked the students if they would mind if I held onto to some of the photos to scan for a blog post.   All of them wanted to keep them (of course) but I assured them that I would bring them back within a couple of days.    We spread out an assortment of photos that were taken and took a quick snapshot ..

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Happy students!

The bounty of images!

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – The bounty of images!

Photo: Justin Goode - RAWR! The Brookhaven Bear!!

Photo: Justin Goode – RAWR! The Brookhaven Bear!!

Later on in the afternoon, I taught their photography club how to do emulsion transfers & lifts.   I had made a few examples at my house a few days earlier.

Emulsion Transfer Example

Emulsion Transfer Example

Image Lift Example

Image Lift Example

Once everyone had arrived, we arranged some trays in a sink and I started showing them how to perform a transfer.   For most, if not all of them, this was the first time they had seen anything like this.  I really enjoy seeing people’s expressions, when they see the emulsion become detached from the plastic cover of integral film.   Most jaws are usually dropped once the emulsion starts to separate.  It looks like an octopus underwater!  I wave my arms around, with octopus-like motions, or what I think an octopus-like motion looks like ;-), when I describe the process.

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Justin Goode - A student peels apart the negative from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode – A student peels apart the negative from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode - A student separates emulsion from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode – A student separates emulsion from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode - Moving the "goop" from hot to cold water

Photo: Justin Goode – Moving the “goop” from hot to cold water

Photo: Justin Goode - A successful first transfer!

Photo: Justin Goode – A successful first transfer!

Photo: Justin Goode - A handful of emulsion transfers

Photo: Justin Goode – A handful of emulsion transfers drying

After I had finished teaching the photography club, one of the students, Scott Mitchell, asked me if he could take my portrait for an article he was writing.  He was going to pitch it to the school’s newspaper later on in the week.   He wanted an image of me, with an assortment of Polaroids taken in their studio.   I dragged the box of cameras in, arranged them on a prop table and he snapped this pic …

Photo: Scott Patrick Mitchell

Photo: Scott Patrick Mitchell

I had the most amazing time teaching these students.   I wouldn’t have done this, if it hadn’t have been for my enormous love for instant photography.  I want to infect people, like a virus, with the passion that I have for instant film.

A giant TEXAS-SIZED shout out to Impossible for providing such an incredible product.  I can’t express enough, how incredibly happy each of them were during this whole process.   Your film just makes people smile and brings joy into this world.  Instant photography is so special.  I haven’t met ONE person that doesn’t appreciate its value.   THANK YOU for enabling me to give the gift of your product to these students.  I have no doubt that I have impacted and inspired them.  I am forever grateful …

Sincerely,

Justin Goode

www.goodephotography.biz

– If you’d like to buy film for your Polaroid camera from The Impossible Project, CLICK HERE – 

A Polaroid Macro 5 SLR + Impossible Project PZ680

September 18, 2012 § 6 Comments

Last weekend, Synthia and I went to the ranch to photograph Erica Perry’s bridal & promo photos.    When we were finished, we headed up to Synthia’s parents house to celebrate her niece’s b-day.   While we were visiting, her mom told us that she had an old 35mm camera at the dentist office that she wanted to give us.   The three of us cruised up the road and rummaged around the attic and found the camera; a Yashica inter-oral macro camera.   The lens has an inner ring flash and is fixed to the body (pretty cool, needs an odd battery).   While we were up there, Synthia’s mom mentioned that they might have an old Polaroid too.   She went searching through some boxes and dug up a Polaroid Macro 5 SLR.   I quickly figured out that this could use Impossible’s Spectra film.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR

The excitement was buzzing through me!  Macros with a Polaroid??? I’d probably seen one of these in the past, but I’d never realized what it could do.    With a SX-70, the closest you can focus is 10 inches.  Being able to focus closer, provides a whole new realm of creativity to dive into.

When I got back home, I searched online and found the Polaroid Macro 5’s manual.  There are 5 different distances in which you can focus the camera; 52, 26, 10, 5 and 3 inches. You press the shutter down 1/2 way and it emits two dots of light from the camera.  As you bring the image into focus, the dots intersect and overlap each other; a dual-light rangefinder. There are two flashes on either side of the lens (which you can toggle on & off separately) and there’s also an external PC port on the camera, so you can slave flashes off-camera.

For those that are going to try any off-camera flash photography, you’ll find the following chart useful.  You should note, that the Polaroid Macro 5 has a fixed shutter speed of 1/50th.   For proper exposures using off-camera flash, you’ll need to use a handheld flash meter to figure out the right output for your strobes/flashes.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR Camera Specifications

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR Camera Specifications

The first image I shot, cliche yes, was of Synthia’s eye.   I wanted to get a feel for just how close this thing could focus.   I set the Macro 5 to focus at its closest distance (3 inches), kept the exposure at neutral with the flashes on, and snapped the photo.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Later on, I went to Archinal Camera to show my friend Robert the newest acquisition.  He’s got a TON of old cameras on a shelf above his desk.   I grabbed an old Kodak camera and snapped another macro for the blog.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Afterwards, I went to my brother’s house and snapped a photo of Edie (my niece).  She was hanging out under the kitchen table.   I set the focus to 26 inches and started rocking back & forth until she was in focus.  She wasn’t too fond of the focusing lights.  When the image developed, I noticed a time stamp on top of the photo.  I pressed the Mode button on the back until “– — —-” showed up, hoping it would turn off that feature.  It did.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

What about its off camera flash capabilities??   I set up a Nikon SB-600, set at 1/16th power, about 3 inches away from a dead fly I found.   I figured, why not?  I set the camera to its closest focusing distance (3 inches) and hooked up some Pocket Wizards.  I turned the Macro 5’s internal flashes off and fired a photo.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

As stated in the Macro 5’s manual, “Test exposures may be required to determine the correct location and settings for the auxiliary flash unit for correct exposure”.  That’s definitely the case.   My Sekonic L-358 can only meter up to f/90.  I was guesstimating the right output on the SB-600 and the exposure is overexposed.  Regardless of the outcome of this photo, it’s pretty nice that you CAN use slaved flashes if you want to venture down that path.

One more test shot with slaved flashes.   This time I used a SB-600 & SB-800 and cross lit my Leica M2.  I set the focusing distance to 10 inches and tested the flash output with the L-358.  It was sitting around f/51-57.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Phew!  Talk about a tough camera to shoot with off-camera flash!  With a fixed shutter speed of 1/50th and also dealing with an aperture range of f/20 – f/100, it certainly makes it challenging.  Now, I haven’t given up on its capabilities yet, however, I think I’ll save this thing for the next time I’m at the Dallas Arboretum.  I would imagine this thing would be great for flower & insect macros.

If macro photography is your cup of tea, you might be interested in picking up a Polaroid Macro 5 SLR from The Impossible Project here, or you can find them online on Ebay.

Thanks for reading!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

PS – Impossible Project has just announced their newest batch of film.  To learn more about the latest advancements CLICK HERE. 

Erica Perry + The CW’s “The Next”

September 11, 2012 § 4 Comments

This past weekend, Synthia and I photographed Erica Perry at one of our favorite places; Buzzard’s Paradise. Erica is a super-talented country singer that has been performing around the metroplex for a few years. We’ve worked with her in the past on various projects which included some promo material for her EP, some images of her band and also some engagement photography.

This time around we shot her bridals and some new promotional photos for her. We figured that our friend’s ranch, Buzzard’s Paradise, was the perfect setting for these images. Of course, I can’t share the bridal photos now, but I can share some of the other photos we shot. A good friend of mine just recently let me borrow his Hasselblad 503CW with an 80mm & 50mm lens, so naturally, I used the hell out of that bad boy on this day. I also used some Impossible Project PX-70 COOL with a Polaroid SX-70.

A few images from this shoot …

Erica Perry - The CW's "The Next" - Hasselblad 503CW - 50mm f/4 - Portra 400VC

Erica Perry – The CW’s “The Next” – Hasselblad 503CW – 50mm f/4 – Portra 400VC

Erica Perry - The CW's "The Next" - Hasselblad 503CW - 50mm f/4 - Ektar 100

Erica Perry – The CW’s “The Next” – Hasselblad 503CW – 50mm f/4 – Ektar 100

Erica Perry - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid SX-70

Erica Perry – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid SX-70

Erica just recently made it to the top 24 of The CW’s The Next television show and this Thursday (9/13), the Dallas episode airs at 8PM. From what I understand, once the producers of The Next whittled down the competition to 24, they toured around to 6 cities to listen to the remaining contestants. Each of the cities had the audience vote and the winner of that particular city is announced when the show airs.

Of course, myself and everybody else I know hopes she wins and makes it to the next round, BUT if she doesn’t, there’s still a chance for her to make it to the finals. You can vote her into the wild card spot on September 20th.

Help support a local rising artist and watch The Next this Thursday night at 8pm! We’re keeping our fingers crossed!!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

NEW Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

September 4, 2012 § 6 Comments

Round three!  Impossible improved on its previous version of PX-680 opacification test film and offered another batch to their pioneers to test.   This time around, I picked up as many as I could (4 packs).

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Luckily, a couple weeks ago, I had picked up a ND4 filter.  I don’t have a 680 and/or 690 so this filter was going to come in VERY handy.  For any non-photogs reading this, a ND4 filter reduces the amount of light that hits the film by a measurement of “2 stops”.   When using a SX-70, a camera optimized for 100 speed film, a ND4 is necessary in order to get proper exposures with 600 speed film.    You still have to underexpose, BUT it makes using PX-680 in a SX-70 do-able.

After the four packs of test film arrived, I loaded up the SX-70 and waited on an opportune time to head outside to snap some test images.  After dinner, Synthia and I decided to walk around part of White Rock Lake.  Killing two birds with one stone; a little bit of exercise & an opportunity to grab a frame …

White Rock Lake - Dallas, TX - Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

White Rock Lake – Dallas, TX – Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

I used the ND4 filter and cranked the exposure down 2/3’rds of the way.   Trusting the ‘black paste’, I ejected it without shielding it, and tucked it away in my bag.

NOTE: When using a ND4 filter with PX-680 film in a SX-70, be aware that the camera is metering for 100 speed film.  Exposures might be a little on the long side depending on where and what you are shooting.  You’ll see examples of softer images in this blog post.   DO NOT think for one second, that PX-680 isn’t sharp.  It’s ridiculously crisp.   

The following afternoon, I burned a few images on my buddy Mike Hawkins; a brilliant guy & solid friend.   He’s been living in Alaska for the past year and just recently got accepted into the Peace Corps.   He’s in town for a month before he makes his way out to Vanuatu (between Papa New Guinea & Fiji) to go teach English.   Ya .. he’s one of those people 😉

I figured a triptych would suit him well.  Hawkins-style; headband, RayBans, some old plaid shirt and his Nalgene.  Word.

– Click the image for a larger size –

Michael Hawkins - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Michael Hawkins – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Later on that evening, Synthia and I went to my grandparents for dinner.  When we arrived, it was nearing sunset, so I grabbed the two of them and snapped a couple of photos before it was too dark.  You should have seen their faces.  They lit up when the image came out of the SX-70.   “A Polaroid!!!”  Yes, Mema & Papa.  That’s how I roll.

My Grandmother.   She's 82 years young :-)

My Grandmother. She’s 82 years young 🙂 ND4 – 1/2 underexposed

Papa - 82 years young as well :-)

Papa – 82 years young as well 🙂

That weekend, my wife and I shot a wedding in Carrollton, TX.   For almost all of the Impossible images I shot, I used PX-70 COOL, but for one image, I used this test film.   There was an elderly couple, that had just finished dancing and I grabbed a quick pic of them as they were walking off the dance floor.    I used the MINT flash bar and had it set, as suggested, at 1/2 power.  I showed their son the image later on and he was ecstatic that I was going to give the bride & groom a stack of ‘polaroids’ that included this one …

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C w/ MINT Flash Bar

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C w/ MINT Flash Bar

A few days later, I went out to play some disc golf with Hawkins.    I snapped one image while we were there.   It was nearing twilight, so the light was fading quickly.  The exposure was nearly a 1/3 – 1/2 of a second.

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Test Film + ND4

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Test Film + ND4 & Neutral

Later on during the week, I stopped by our local neighborhood convenient store to grab a drink.   I’ve been going here for a good 15+ years and the owners are super friendly.  Ryan, the one I seem to talk to the most was working this particular afternoon.  As I was paying for my drink, I asked him if he would mind if I took a photo of him with this new test film I had.   He smiled and said “Of course!”  We stepped outside and I had him sit on the curb in front of the store.   Because were we pretty deep in the shade, the exposure was a little long (maybe 1/10th).

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

After I snapped his photo, I took a quick snapshot of their sign (ND4 & -2/3rd’s).  I ejected the film, without shielding it, in direct sunlight.  I cruised back up there later on and gave Ryan the images I took.   I figured he & his family would appreciate them.

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Overall .. WOW!  A huuuuuuuuge improvement in the color, compared to the PX-680 V4B that I tested out a month ago.   ALL OF THESE images were shot without being shielded, upon ejection.    The anti-opacification molecule is working wonders.   Granted, if you don’t want a vintage look like the image above has, you might want to shield in direct sunlight.  However, having that look as an option just gives you more creative flexibility on the spot.    How cool is that?

The only thing I’m wondering is, upon the release of these new films, how long will it be before Impossible reveals the camera they have been working on?

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

Impossible Project PX-70 V4B Opacification Test Film

August 24, 2012 § 6 Comments

A new batch of test film via The Impossible Project!   This particular batch is PX-70, optimized for use in SX-70 cameras.  PX-70 is rated at 125 ASA, where as the PX-680 V4B I tested was rated about 640 ASA.  For these tests, I’ll be shooting in various lighting scenarios; in the shade, overcast day, sunny day, indoors, using flash etc.

Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

— The first image I shot was of our boxer, Maybelle.  She’s been catching/chewing up sticks & tennis balls in the backyard lately.  I shot this with a dark-slide protecting the image from direct light nearing sundown, however when I went back inside and removed the photo, I placed it right side up to develop.  I’m guessing, but it looks as if the anti-opacification juice has been ‘upped’ a little bit.   As stated on their website, this version of PX-70 does take 35-45 minutes to fully develop.

Impossible Project PX70-V4B Anti-Opacifiation Test Film - Polaroid SX-70

Impossible Project PX70-V4B Anti-Opacifiation Test Film – Polaroid SX-70

Off the bat, A HUGE IMPROVEMENT over the PX680 I tested a few weeks ago.  The colors that were in the scene are represented very well in this image.

— My wife and I had a portrait shoot in downtown Dallas.   While I was in the Arts District, I grabbed a quick photo of the new Museum Tower.  When the newsletter came out for this particular test film, Impossible stated that you should “shield from direct sunlight, with little stress if the sun hits it shortly”.  It was an overcast morning, and admittedly I was overcautious. I did shield this particular image and tucked it away in a box to develop.  I cranked the exposure all the way down and fired away.  I checked on it every minute or so for the first 15 minutes and then brought it out into the open light to watch it develop.

Museum Tower - Dallas, TX - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B - SX-70

Museum Tower – Dallas, TX – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B – SX-70

— Fair Park: For the following, the image was taken with the exposure dial cranked all the way down and the image was ejected into the open in the shade. The image was exposed to ambient light for about 5-10 seconds, while I flipped it over and tucked it away in a box.  There looks to be little difference in the sky, between the image shielded at the Museum Tower and the image of the Texas Star Ferris Wheel.

Fair Park - Dallas, TX - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B - SX-70

A peek at The Texas Star – Dallas, TX – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B – SX-70

— I had picked up some flowers for Synthia, so I decided to use them to test the color indoors.  I set them near the window and cranked the exposure dial down 2/3’rds of the way on the SX-70.  I’m weary of over-exposure; can you tell?  For this image, it was shot near a window indoors, without being shielded, and was developed out in the open.   To be honest, I would probably focus this a little differently if I had the chance to do it over.   In my hurried state of excitement, I just let the autofocus go where it wanted to.

Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

— I went out later to a DART rail station by my house.  The sun had just set, so I went ahead and shot the image, cranked 2/3’rds of the way down & unshielded.  Once it ejected, I tucked it away in my bag.   When I got back to my car (after maybe 2 minutes), I pulled the image out and drove back home.

Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

— Another image grabbed was at a Rangers game.  The last time I went to one, I had shot some with a Spectra & some PZ680.   This time around, I was happy to have the SX-70 loaded up with this test film 🙂  We had tickets alllllllll the way up top and I snapped an image of the viewpoint.   This was shot unshielded @ 2/3’rds dark and was tucked away into a box to develop seconds afterwards.

The Ballpark in Arlington - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

The Ballpark in Arlington – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

Unfortunately, since it was an evening game, I didn’t get to shoot as much as I would have liked.   The ambient light faded quickly and I decided to NOT test fate on iffy exposures.

— I went up to Zak’s Donuts to snag a quick pic of a donut with sprinkles.   It would be a good test of the film’s sharpness.   I did the, now, normal routine of shooting it unshielded & tucked it away in the box.  I shot this @ 2/3’rds dark, near a window.   NOTE:  As as I’ve also seen some state online, this particular batch of PX-70 film needs a little more exposure than what you’re used to giving it.   I probably could have shot this at 1/2 – 1/3 dark and been OK.

Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B Opacification Test Film

Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B Opacification Test Film

— A quick shot of Synthia at the park.   I used the Impossible flash bar by MINT @ 1/2 power and had the exposure dial set in the center.   Shot unshielded and tucked away.  It’s a little underexposed.   I’ll try full power and maybe 1/3’rd dark next time around at this distance.

Impossible Project PX-70 V4B w/ MINT flash bar at 1/2 power

Impossible Project PX-70 V4B w/ MINT flash bar at 1/2 power

— We ate at the Crazy Horse Saloon in Rockwall, TX.   I snagged this photo just outside the restaurant/bar that’s located in the marina.  Synthia suggested to shoot it upside-down.  It was a little tricky but not too bad.  This image was shot 2/3’rds dark and unshielded.

Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 V4B

The last example image shot was the one at the beginning of the article.  I used the Impossible Flash Bar at 1/2 power to fire 3 other flashes in a small studio setup.   I used two strip boxes and a SB-800 flash to help illuminate the scene.  Please excuse the flash stand haha … 

If you’ve never shot Impossible Film before, NOW IS THE TIME to get on the wagon.   Word on the street is that these versions of their films will be available THIS FALL.   Think about it.   Pick yourself up any type of Polaroid 600, Spectra, or SX-70 and you’ll be set!  Because the newer batches of film aren’t as sensitive to light, all you have to do is tuck the image away within a few seconds to develop, OR if you’re indoors, you can watch it develop!  Up until this point, the images have needed a high level of protection in order to keep them safe from ambient light when the initial stages of development had begun.  Shielding the film has been a necessity.   Very quickly, that level of protection is becoming less & less needed.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

BUY IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT FILM HERE

Olympus XA: The Mini-Rangefinder

August 12, 2012 § 7 Comments

About 6 months ago, I was visiting my friend Robert at Archinal Camera; a repair shop/photography studio in Richardson. I’ve known the owner for a few years now and I regularly stop in to say hello. When I’m there, I usually look through the random assortment of items & cameras that he has around the shop. It can be a glimpse into the past; sort of a visual road map of where photography has come from. His family has been in the camera repair business since the 50’s, so as you would imagine, there is quite an array of assorted odds & ends. On this particular day, I was browsing through the display case up front. One camera had always caught my eye, yet I had never picked it up, nor had I ever asked about it. It was an Olympus camera with a weird looking flash attachment on its left side. I asked Robert “Hey, what’s this?” He chuckled, “That old thing? It’s a useless old Olympus rangefinder. They used to be really popular back in the 1980’s. You want it? Here!” He picked it up out of the display case and set it on the counter. “It’s yours!” he exclaimed. “That thing has been in there forever …”

Olympus XA 35mm f/2.8 w/ A16 Flash Attachment

Olympus XA 35mm f/2.8 w/ A16 Flash Attachment

Useless? I think not. It’s a mini-rangefinder!! After we visited a little while longer, I thanked him and made my way home. Once there, I proceeded to fiddle with the camera; looked through the viewfinder, checked how the focus worked, looked at the lens (35mm f/2.8-22), played around with the flash, screwed around with the apertures, etc.

– CLICK HERE for the Olympus XA Manual –

This thing is a rockin’ little camera. It can fit in your pocket, purse or wherever. When the flash attachment is removed, it easily fits in the palm of my hand. For film lovers, the XA is a great camera for snagging & sneaking images, of any subject you like, at any particular time.

Olympus XA 35mm f/2.8

Olympus XA 35mm f/2.8

I took it with me to the drive-in movie theater near Ennis, TX. The Galaxy Theatre is a blast!  Well .. when it’s not 100 degrees at 9pm. Lucky for us, even though it was August, there was a storm front moving through, so we enjoyed the movie when the temps were in the 80’s.

Galaxy Movie Theatre - Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Galaxy Movie Theatre – Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Galaxy Drive In Theatre - Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Galaxy Drive In Theatre – Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Galaxy Movie Theatre - Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Galaxy Movie Theatre – Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

A few other snapshots from the Olympus XA …

f/22 @ 1/60th - Olympus XA - Delta 400 - D76

f/22 @ 1/60th – Olympus XA – Delta 400 – D76

Cavanaugh Flight Museum - Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Cavanaugh Flight Museum – Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Cavanaugh Flight Museum - Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Cavanaugh Flight Museum – Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

You can bring this thing with you everywhere! It’s useful for many things, but I’ve found it’s particularly nice for grab-shots with family & friends. Because it’s so small & quiet, once you get out of the initial oh-you’ve-got-a-camera-and-you’re-taking-pictures-of-me stage, most of the time taking an image with it will go unnoticed. You can use the rangefinder to accurately focus, or if you like ‘shooting from the hip’, simply pick an aperture that will give you the right amount of depth-of-field, pre-focus the camera using the scale on top of the lens, and plink away snapshots.

Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800

Olympus XA - Kodak 35mm Ektar

Olympus XA – Kodak Ektar

Olympus XA - Kodak Ektar

Olympus XA – Kodak Ektar

Olympus XA - Kodak 35mm Ektar

Olympus XA – Kodak 35mm Ektar

A quick test of the A16 flash. Ride ’em Jones!

Olympus XA - Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800 w/ A16 Flash

Olympus XA – Ilford HP5 Plus @ 800 w/ A16 Flash

Now this is definitely not the sharpest lens/camera option out there, but that’s not what I’m after when using this camera. When shooting with the XA, you go into it knowing there are optical concessions.

For those that enjoy film photography, this camera is nice to keep on hand, wherever you go. Because of its size and how it’s built, it can be the perfect film camera to stow away for quick candid grab shots and other photo opps that interest you.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

OLYMPUS XAs ON EBAY

Impossible Project PX-680 V4B Opacification Test Film

August 1, 2012 § 8 Comments

Impossible Project announced to their pioneers last week, that their chief chemist Martin Steinmeijer, had invented a brand new opacification molecule.   They said it’s designed to completely absorb light as the photograph exits the camera and remains colorless and transparent once the image has fully developed. TIP also stated “this new molecule is as powerful as the molecule used in the original Polaroid materials and for the first time will allow you to take your Impossible photographs without the need of immediate shielding.” THIS is what everyone has been waiting for.

I received the pioneer newsletter in my email one morning, and when I saw how fast the packs were going, I snagged two of them (limit of 4). I was going to wait, but I’m so glad I didn’t … they sold all 400 packs available in the states, in under 30 minutes.  When the film came in the mail a few days later, I was pretty excited.  This was the first time I’d been able to test a new batch of film … I ripped open the package.

Impossible Project PX680-V4B Test Film

Impossible Project PX680-V4B Test Film – SWEEEEET.

I didn’t have a Polaroid 680/690 to shoot this film with, nor did I have a ND4 filter to slap on the SX-70 .. but I did have a Polaroid One Step Flash that had been sitting on my shelf.  I figured I’d shoot a variety of subjects with the OneStepFlash, the RB67 and possibly the SX-70+ND2 lit by the mid-day sun, indoor on-camera flash, studio strobes, ambient light, long-exposures etc.

I loaded up the first pack of film and headed out with Synthia. We ended up going to the Design District Gallery Day to check out some new photographs that were at PDNB. I was going to snag some photos but it was 106 outdoors and nothing really looked worthy enough.  We ended up cruising up the road to one of my favorite overlooks of downtown.  Over the past couple of months, I had come here to snag two other impossible photos on an overcast day and in the evening.   I jumped out of the car, cranked the exposure down & fired off a shot with the OneStepFlash.  WITHOUT SHIELDING THE PHOTO, it ejected into the blazin’ sun when it was still 100+ degrees.  During the ride home, the photo developed out in the open & in my lap for about 30 minutes (at 80ish degrees I would imagine).

Dallas, TX - Polaroid OneStep Flash - Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Dallas, TX – Polaroid OneStep Flash – Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Regarding the color you’ll see in these images, TIP stated “these packs are not yet fully optimized for color performance .. it is still being worked on at this time .. the focus was on the opacification layer.”

My friend JV had met up with us to check out the gallery, so after we got back home, I set up a few lights and took a picture of him.  Don’t look too serious now buddy … 😉

Impossible Project PX-680-V4B Test Film - Mamiya RB67 - 105mm SF-C

Impossible Project PX-680-V4B Test Film – Mamiya RB67 – 105mm SF-C – Developed @ 75 degrees

I shot this particular impossible photo on the RB67.  After I shot it, I went to a dark closet to extract the photo, put it in an empty PX-70 pack and slid it fully inside the SX-70.  Then I brought the SX-70 out into a lit room, closed the front .. *camera ejects film* .. and BAM – opacification molecules doing their ‘thang’ in the light.  It sat on a table for 25 minutes developing in the office.

Later on in the weekend, I figured a test of the highlights, and how the film handled harsh on-camera-flash would be good to have.  I snapped a pic of Maybelle indoors (by enticing her with treats) and walked the exposed picture over to an area I had set up by the window.  I shot a stop-motion video sequence with the D700 so I could show how the picture developed. I snapped a photo every 5-10 seconds over a 25 minute period, but admittedly it was probably every 3-5 once the development started to kick in.  The image is about as good as I would expect from a OneStep indoors, with a bright blaring flash .. *poor Maybelle .. she got lots of love after being temporarily blinded*

Polaroid OneStep Flash - PX680-V4B - Even Exposure

Polaroid OneStep Flash – PX680-V4B – Even Exposure – Developed @ 80 degrees

The next day, I ended up experimenting a little bit and extracted a test photo *in the darkroom*, slid it inside an empty Spectra pack and loaded up my Spectra AF.  Why not?

I went up the road and snagged a quick photo of a donut shop.  The sun was probably a little behind me to my left and it was 4 o’clock.   I shot it with an even exposure.  When I got back home, I went back into the closet to do the impossible shuffle and again, brought the camera out to eject the photo into the light to test the new opacification molecule.

Spectra AF - Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Spectra AF – Impossible Project PX-680 V4B – Developed @ 75 degrees

One thing I have noticed, is that the level of goopyness in the shadows isn’t as pronounced as it has been in the past.   In previous versions of their films, there were blobs and a splotchiness to the images (which honestly I liked) which is not prevalent in these test packs.

I liked the outcome of the first Spectra image, so I loaded up another shot and went out later to test a long exposure.   I ended up cruising to The Dog Stop; a place I ate at years ago with my wife one day.   I set the Spectra up on a tripod and bumped the exposure up 1/3rd of the way; it was about a second or two as I recall.   I drove back home and did the impossible shuffle yet again, so the image could develop in the light.

Spectra AF - Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Spectra AF – Impossible Project PX-680 V4B – Developed 75 degrees

The following day, I stuck with the theme of ‘random-buildings-i-have-always-wanted-to-shoot-but-never-have’ around the area and snapped another photo with the Spectra.

Como Motel - Spectra AF - Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Como Motel – Spectra AF – Impossible Project PX-680 V4B – Fully Underexposed – Developed 75 degrees

OK – Enough with the building photos ..

I loaded up the PX680-V4B in my SX-70 and swung by the lake.  The sun had just set and there was this incredible light on the lake (isn’t that always the case ;-)).  I cranked the exposure dial all the way down and hoped for the best …

White Rock Lake - Impossible Project PX-680 V4B - Polaroid SX-70 - Exposure Down

White Rock Lake – Impossible Project PX-680 V4B – Polaroid SX-70 – Exposure Down – Developed 90 degrees

Again, less goopy-ness in the shadows.  It does look like the overall quality of the highlights & shadows are improving.   It seems, like in this image, it’s getting a little less gunked up and is rendering smoother tonal gradations.  Now with that said, I love the gunk/funk of the old images.   That’s part of what makes those old-gen, 12/11, NIGO and other variations so cool.  I just like it gunky.

EDIT: One more from the RB …

Mamiya RB67 - 105mm SF-C - Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Mamiya RB67 – 105mm SF-C – Impossible Project PX-680 V4B

Same thing.  Did the impossible shuffle to extract the photo and get it into the SX-70, however, after I ejected the photo in the light, I stowed it away, a few seconds afterwards, in a box for the duration of the development @ 75 degrees.

Overall, it looks to be a massive improvement in the way their films can handle direct ambient indoor light & outdoor light once the image has started its development.  The Impossible chemists have been trying to solve the opacification issue for a while.  Soon in the near future, as I did with these,  you WILL NOT HAVE TO SHIELD THE PHOTO as it ejects from the camera.  This is a HUGE step forward.  There will be no need to teach shielding techniques to new shooters, nor will there be a need to convince them that all the hassle is worth it.   For the average person, who might want something special beyond a digital snapshot,  this is a massive leap in their direction.   Convincing them to use Impossible Project film will be a hell of a lot easier, when shielding the film isn’t a necessity.  Bravo Impossible .. Bravo.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

CHECK OUT this discussion regarding the new opacification test film on Impossible’s Flickr page

TO BUY IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT FILM CLICK HERE

MY TOP TEN REASONS TO SHOOT IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT FILM

The Beauty & Advantage of Using Medium Format Film

July 28, 2012 § 24 Comments

Nowadays, when people start their journey into photography, most begin on the digital path using their phones, a point & shoot or an entry level DLSR.  If you’re someone that really ‘gets the bug’, you’ll gain an increased awareness of the larger tools available to use with film.  If photography is something you really enjoy, picking up a medium format film camera can open up a world of visual yumminess (yes, yumminess) that just isn’t possible with an entry-level digital setup.  There are many options out there for medium format film photography.  HolgaKiev, Mamiya, Fuji, and Hasselblad are just a few of the cameras available, and you can find a wide variety of film at BHPhotoVideo or Adorama.

- Mamiya C330S w/ 105mm f/3.5 -

– Mamiya C330S w/ 105mm f/3.5 –

My current camera of choice for medium format is a Mamiya C330S.  C330’s are TLR cameras that were made from the 70’s through the early 90’s and they are pretty fun to shoot.  Because it’s fully mechanical and void of any electronics (like I like it), it slows you down and makes you think about everything regarding the image you want to take.

The HUGE advantage of shooting with medium and large format cameras, is that the surface area being exposed on the negative, is SO MUCH larger than what’s exposed on 35mm or P&S cameras.  As a result, both quality and detail, are drastically improved.

I found a chart on Wikipedia by MarcusGR and for comparison, I added a couple of medium format film sizes (6×6 and 645).  The chart shows up to 6×6, but you can also shoot 6×7, 6×9 and wider on medium format film.

Comparison between digital sensor sizes & a couple of MF film sizes - Not to Scale

Comparison between digital sensor sizes & a couple of MF film sizes

Once  it’s developed, film can be digitized with a dedicated film scanner.  When medium format negatives are scanned, depending on the resolution chosen, you can have image sizes upward and well beyond of a hundred megapixels.   Another bonus, is that once you have the digital negative, you can crop it to whatever aspect ratio you’d like (4×6, 5×7, 8×10 etc. if preferred).  Granted, you can crop anything.  However, when you have a massive amount of ‘information’ at your disposal with larger format negatives, cropping doesn’t drastically decrease the overall quality, like it can when cropping some digital images.

Another perk to MF & LF photography, is how depth of field (DOF) changes.    If you’ve been shooting for a while in the 35mm format, you’re probably used to how f/2.8, f/4 & f/16 for example, changes DOF. As you move up in film size, the DOF decreases.   When I started shooting MF,  I quickly learned that f/8 on the Mamiya was not the same as f/8 on my 35mm cameras.  You have to be a lot more careful when focusing with these larger formats, because even when ‘stopped down’,  you might only be focusing a sliver of sharpness back and forth in the frame.

EDIT:  My Dad pointed out a couple of things in the comments below  .. “Two other benefits that 35mm film shooters may not be aware of are these 1) grain is less apparent when shooting higher speed films in medium format. The appearance of grain is inversely related to the size of the negative. The bigger the negative, the less apparent the grain. 2) the tonal range of any given film is more apparent. Again, it relates to the size of the negative. Here, the apparent tonal range is directly proportionate to the size of the negative: the large the negative, the more subtle the tones.”

There’s an undeniable, aesthetic appeal to the images created with MF & LF cameras.  They create looks that just aren’t possible with P&S and 35mm cameras.  In this day and age, because  of the world’s focus on pixel-cramming digital technology, the price point to get the look of medium format film, is relatively low.  Take advantage if you can.

A handful of medium format images …

Mamiya C330 - 80mm f/2.8 - Pan F Plus - Rodinal

Mamiya C330 – 80mm f/2.8 – Pan F Plus – Rodinal

State Fair of Texas - Mamiya C330 - 55mm f/4.5 - Delta 3200

State Fair of Texas – Mamiya C330 – 55mm f/4.5 – Delta 3200

David DeShazo - Mamiya C330S - 55mm f/4.5 - Kodak Tri-X - DDX

David DeShazo – Mamiya C330S – 55mm f/4.5 – Kodak Tri-X – DDX

Mamiya C330S - 80mm f/2.8 - Acros 100 - Rodinal

Mamiya C330S – 80mm f/2.8 – Acros 100 – Rodinal

Mamiya C330S - 55mm f/4.5 - Pan F Plus - Rodinal

Mamiya C330S – 55mm f/4.5 – Pan F Plus – Rodinal

Pacifica, CA - Mamiya C330S - Kodak Tri-X - Ilfosol DDX -

Pacifica, CA – Mamiya C330S – Kodak Tri-X – Ilfosol DDX –

Grant Pittman - Mamiya C330S - 80mm f/2.8 - Adox 25 - Rodinal

Grant Pittman – Mamiya C330S – 80mm f/2.8 – Adox 25 – Rodinal

Maybelle - C330S - 80mm f/2.8 - Neopan - Rodinal

Maybelle – C330S – 80mm f/2.8 – Neopan – Rodinal

Transamerica Pyramid - San Francisco - Mamiya C330S - 55mm f/4.5 - Acros - Rodinal

Transamerica Pyramid – San Francisco – Mamiya C330S – 55mm f/4.5 – Acros – Rodinal

Mamiya RB67 - 150mm SF-C - Delta 400

Mamiya RB67 – 150mm SF-C – Delta 400

Arches National Park - Mamiya C330S - 80mm f/2.8

Arches National Park – Mamiya C330S – 80mm f/2.8

Mamiya RB67 - 90mm f/3.8 - Delta 400 - D76

Mamiya RB67 – 90mm f/3.8 – Delta 400 – D76

Mamiya RB67 - 90mm f/3.8 - Tmax 400 - Rodinal

Mamiya RB67 – 90mm f/3.8 – Tmax 400 – Rodinal

Pacifica, CA - Mamiya C330S - 80mm f2.8 - Ektar 100

Pacifica, CA – Mamiya C330S – 80mm f2.8 – Ektar 100

Mamiya C330S - 105mm f/3.5 - Ektar 100

Chevy Cameo – Mamiya C330S – 105mm f/3.5 – Ektar 100

Club Med - Punta Cana, DM - Mamiya C330S - 80mm f/2.8 - Ektar 100

Club Med – Punta Cana, DM – Mamiya C330S – 80mm f/2.8 – Ektar 100

Punta Cana, DM - Mamiya C330S - 55mm f/4.5 - Ektar 100

Punta Cana, DM – Mamiya C330S – 55mm f/4.5 – Ektar 100

Grace Bay Beach - Turks & Caicos - Mamiya RB67 - Portra 400VC

Grace Bay Beach – Turks & Caicos – Mamiya RB67 – Portra 400VC

Buzzard's Paradise - Mamiya RB67 - Ektar 100

Buzzard’s Paradise – Mamiya RB67 – Ektar 100

Buzzard's Paradise - Mamiya RB67 - 90mm f/3.8 - Ektar 100

Buzzard’s Paradise – Mamiya RB67 – 90mm f/3.8 – Ektar 100

Mamiya RB67 - 150mm SF-C f/4 - Velvia 50

Del’s Charcoal Burgers – Mamiya RB67 – 150mm SF-C f/4 – Velvia 50

Monument Valley - Mamiya C330S - 55mm f/4.5 - Ektar 100

Monument Valley – Mamiya C330S – 55mm f/4.5 – Ektar 100

Some medium format cameras can also use Polaroid backs as well.   I’ve taken a bunch of Fuji peel-apart film, as well as an ever-increasing number of Impossible Project photos on the Mamiya RB67.  You get great results with both types of instant film.  Below are a couple of images shot with the RB67 and Fuji B&W peel-apart film.  Note how much of the image is exposed through this method.

Mamiya RB67 - 90mm f/3.8 - Fuji FP-100B

Mamiya RB67 – 90mm f/3.8 – Fuji FP-100B

Turks & Caicos - Mamiya RB67 - 90mm f/3.8 - Fuji FP-100B

Turks & Caicos – Mamiya RB67 – 90mm f/3.8 – Fuji FP-100B

And finally as a bonus, some medium format cameras make for great props! 🙂

A C330, a D700 & a few lights ;-)

A C330, a D700 & a few lights 😉

Thanks for reading!  You are appreciated!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

PS – MOST of these photos are available as prints.   If you’d like more information on purchasing, contact me at info@goodephotography.biz.

ON A SIDE NOTE: Last year, I was shooting a lot of portraits on B&W through the C330 and I made a stop-motion video promoting our business. The video consists of hundreds of images detailing part of the process of shooting, developing, scanning & retouching film portraits.  The music is by Curt Bisquera; a ridiculously talented drummer/musician that I met a few years ago through my brother.  The song “Pimp D” has a cool, west-coast vibe.  If you haven’t seen the video before, it’s worth checking out on the larger size through YouTube.

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