NEW Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

September 4, 2012 § 6 Comments

Round three!  Impossible improved on its previous version of PX-680 opacification test film and offered another batch to their pioneers to test.   This time around, I picked up as many as I could (4 packs).

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Luckily, a couple weeks ago, I had picked up a ND4 filter.  I don’t have a 680 and/or 690 so this filter was going to come in VERY handy.  For any non-photogs reading this, a ND4 filter reduces the amount of light that hits the film by a measurement of “2 stops”.   When using a SX-70, a camera optimized for 100 speed film, a ND4 is necessary in order to get proper exposures with 600 speed film.    You still have to underexpose, BUT it makes using PX-680 in a SX-70 do-able.

After the four packs of test film arrived, I loaded up the SX-70 and waited on an opportune time to head outside to snap some test images.  After dinner, Synthia and I decided to walk around part of White Rock Lake.  Killing two birds with one stone; a little bit of exercise & an opportunity to grab a frame …

White Rock Lake - Dallas, TX - Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

White Rock Lake – Dallas, TX – Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

I used the ND4 filter and cranked the exposure down 2/3’rds of the way.   Trusting the ‘black paste’, I ejected it without shielding it, and tucked it away in my bag.

NOTE: When using a ND4 filter with PX-680 film in a SX-70, be aware that the camera is metering for 100 speed film.  Exposures might be a little on the long side depending on where and what you are shooting.  You’ll see examples of softer images in this blog post.   DO NOT think for one second, that PX-680 isn’t sharp.  It’s ridiculously crisp.   

The following afternoon, I burned a few images on my buddy Mike Hawkins; a brilliant guy & solid friend.   He’s been living in Alaska for the past year and just recently got accepted into the Peace Corps.   He’s in town for a month before he makes his way out to Vanuatu (between Papa New Guinea & Fiji) to go teach English.   Ya .. he’s one of those people 😉

I figured a triptych would suit him well.  Hawkins-style; headband, RayBans, some old plaid shirt and his Nalgene.  Word.

– Click the image for a larger size –

Michael Hawkins - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Michael Hawkins – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Later on that evening, Synthia and I went to my grandparents for dinner.  When we arrived, it was nearing sunset, so I grabbed the two of them and snapped a couple of photos before it was too dark.  You should have seen their faces.  They lit up when the image came out of the SX-70.   “A Polaroid!!!”  Yes, Mema & Papa.  That’s how I roll.

My Grandmother.   She's 82 years young :-)

My Grandmother. She’s 82 years young 🙂 ND4 – 1/2 underexposed

Papa - 82 years young as well :-)

Papa – 82 years young as well 🙂

That weekend, my wife and I shot a wedding in Carrollton, TX.   For almost all of the Impossible images I shot, I used PX-70 COOL, but for one image, I used this test film.   There was an elderly couple, that had just finished dancing and I grabbed a quick pic of them as they were walking off the dance floor.    I used the MINT flash bar and had it set, as suggested, at 1/2 power.  I showed their son the image later on and he was ecstatic that I was going to give the bride & groom a stack of ‘polaroids’ that included this one …

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C w/ MINT Flash Bar

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C w/ MINT Flash Bar

A few days later, I went out to play some disc golf with Hawkins.    I snapped one image while we were there.   It was nearing twilight, so the light was fading quickly.  The exposure was nearly a 1/3 – 1/2 of a second.

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Test Film + ND4

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Test Film + ND4 & Neutral

Later on during the week, I stopped by our local neighborhood convenient store to grab a drink.   I’ve been going here for a good 15+ years and the owners are super friendly.  Ryan, the one I seem to talk to the most was working this particular afternoon.  As I was paying for my drink, I asked him if he would mind if I took a photo of him with this new test film I had.   He smiled and said “Of course!”  We stepped outside and I had him sit on the curb in front of the store.   Because were we pretty deep in the shade, the exposure was a little long (maybe 1/10th).

Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

After I snapped his photo, I took a quick snapshot of their sign (ND4 & -2/3rd’s).  I ejected the film, without shielding it, in direct sunlight.  I cruised back up there later on and gave Ryan the images I took.   I figured he & his family would appreciate them.

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Unshielded Impossible Project PX-680 V4C Black Paste Film

Overall .. WOW!  A huuuuuuuuge improvement in the color, compared to the PX-680 V4B that I tested out a month ago.   ALL OF THESE images were shot without being shielded, upon ejection.    The anti-opacification molecule is working wonders.   Granted, if you don’t want a vintage look like the image above has, you might want to shield in direct sunlight.  However, having that look as an option just gives you more creative flexibility on the spot.    How cool is that?

The only thing I’m wondering is, upon the release of these new films, how long will it be before Impossible reveals the camera they have been working on?

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT

A Road Trip to Aspen + Impossible Project + Leica M2 & 15mm – Part:1/4

July 11, 2012 § 6 Comments

A road trip to Aspen.  Two of my favorite people, Kristina & Kat, are fortunate enough to live there and my wife and I have visited them a couple of times since they moved.  We have vowed to make the trip every year at least once.  If you drive to Aspen it’s about ~ 16 hours from Dallas, but totally worth it.   Granted, it takes 10 hours to get out of Texas, but who cares .. the last 6 are filled with an inspiring landscape worthy of any road trip.  Colorado just makes you feel so good.   Being there replenishes my soul ..

The plan was to leave on Tuesday night, July 3rd.    We’d drive through the evening, take a nap for a few hours in Raton, NM and then hit the road again.  Luckily, the adrenaline of being on a road trip usually just keeps me going.    We decided to take Maybelle, one of our dogs, with us.   She’s a 2 1/2 year old boxer and we knew that she would have the time of her life up there.

I brought a variety of cameras with me; a Leica M2, a Polaroid Sonar SX-70, a Polaroid 100 Land Camera and a Mamiya C330.  For film, I brought some PX-70 COOL & NIGO, Kodak Ektar 100, Fuji Acros 100 & Adox CMS 20.   🙂  Synthia brought her Spectra SE and her grab bag of Spectra film.   She’s been shooting a lot with it and is loving the black frame PZ600.  It has this really cool vintage look and it ended being a perfect fit for the images she shot on this trip.

We packed all of the other essentials and ended up leaving at 7 o’clock.   After we drove 6 hours and made it into Amarillo, we chose to just make the push to Aspen without stopping, and took turns driving and sleeping through the night.   I can’t believe we had it in us to drive straight to Aspen from Dallas.

The Road to Westcliffe, CO - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

The Road to Westcliffe, CO – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Twin Lakes - Colorado - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Twin Lakes – Colorado – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Once we got over Independence Pass and were making our way into town, we stopped at a grove of trees and Synthia snapped this killer B&W shot with some black frame PZ600 …

Photo: Synthia Goode - Aspen, CO - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

Photo: Synthia Goode – Aspen, CO – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

Our little Scion arrived in Aspen at 11am,  just enough time to take a quick shower and find a spot to relax before the July 4th parade started.    The four of us sat down at Hunters Bar and enjoyed some good ol’ fashioned ‘merican food (beer, burgers & dogs) while watching the parade from a distance.  We both snuck up for a couple of frames of the festivities …

Three-wheeled Unicycle - Aspen 4th of July Parade 2012- Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Three-wheeled Unicycle – 4th of July Parade 2012- Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Synthia Goode - 4th of July Parade - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

Photo: Synthia Goode – 4th of July Parade – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

After the parade was over, Kristina and Kat had to head into work so Synthia and I went back to their place and passed out.  When we woke up from our much needed nap, we decided to grab a quick bite to eat.

We ended up going to New York Pizza.  Last year, I had met a local photographer by the name of Michael Brands there when I was in town.  He had mentioned that his friend had just opened up a photography gallery in Aspen called The Nugget that was worth checking out.  I made a point to stop in again this year to show Synthia and to introduce myself to the owner, Ross.     When we walked inside, there were some fantastic photo-realistic paintings that a friend of his was showing.  We started talking photography and about 1/2 way through our conversation, I asked him if he still shot instant film and if he had heard of The Impossible Project.  He had not 🙂  I filled him in on the details and his interest seemed to pique when I mentioned that Impossible was now making 8×0 film as well.  Later in the evening, when Synthia and I were walking around, she chuckled and said that TIP needs to hire me as a spokesman for their product.    I’m practically an evangelist for them!  But you know what?  They deserve all of the positive press they can get.

The next morning, we all woke up and hiked part of Lost Man Loop.  We probably hiked about an hour or so before turning around.   It was a great warm up for us and I’m glad we ended up taking it a little easy.  I think Synthia and I were still a little beat from the drive and adjusting to the altitude.

Fly Fishing @ Lost Man Reservoir - Leica M2 - 15mm Voigtlander - Ektar 100

Fly Fishing @ Lost Man Reservoir – Leica M2 – 15mm Voigtlander – Ektar 100

Maybelle grabbin' a quick drink - Leica M2 - 15mm Voigtlander - Ektar 100

Maybelle grabbin’ a quick drink – Leica M2 – 15mm Voigtlander – Ektar 100

Hiking Lost Man Loop Trail - Leica M2 - Voigtlander 15mm - Ektar 100

Hiking Lost Man Loop Trail – Leica M2 – Voigtlander 15mm – Ektar 100

Photo: Synthia Goode - Lost Man Loop Trail - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

Photo: Synthia Goode – Lost Man Loop Trail – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

After we got back, we were starving so we all ordered some grub from The Big Wrap.   Kat recommended I have the Babs-E-Que and I’m so glad I did .. it was CRAZY good!  Apparently this joint is packed all the time and rightfully so.

When the ladies went off to work, Synthia and I took their jeep out and drove up Hunter Creek Rd. to the ghost town of Ashcroft.

Representin' - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Representin’ – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

We had snowshoed right by this place in Feburary of 2011.  To see it again in the summer was really cool.  The town sprung up in in the early 1880’s when there was a silver boom in the area.   At its peak, there were about 2,000 people living and working there.   The mines initially produced 14,000 ounces of silver to the ton, but unfortunately for Ashcroft, it turned out to just be shallow deposits.   As quickly as it boomed, Ashcroft went a bust.

Ashcroft Ghost Town - Leica M2 - Voigtlander 15mm - Ektar 100

Ashcroft Ghost Town – Leica M2 – Voigtlander 15mm – Ektar 100

Ashcroft Ghost Town - Leica M2 - 15mm Voigtlander - Ektar 100

Ashcroft Ghost Town – Leica M2 – 15mm Voigtlander – Ektar 100

Ashcroft Hotel - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Ashcroft Hotel – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

The view from Ashcroft Hotel - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

The view from Ashcroft Hotel – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

After a little while, a family met up with us and asked Synthia to snap a photo with their camera.   When she was handing it back, she asked them if they wanted an instant photo.   At first they said no because they didn’t want us to waste our film, but after showing them a photo that Synthia took of me on the hotel steps, their attitudes changed.

Photo: Synthia Goode - Ashcroft Hotel - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

Photo: Synthia Goode – Ashcroft Hotel – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

“Did you use some sort of filter for that?”  “No.   It’s just the way this particular film looks …” Synthia replied.   After she shot their family photo and tucked it away in a brochure, we explained to them that they had to wait a little while before taking a peek.   They were grateful and went on their way.

We moseyed our way back through the ghost town and then stopped at a nearby picnic table so we could just soak in the surroundings …

Ashcroft, Colorado - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Ashcroft, Colorado – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL

Photo: Synthia Goode - Ashcroft, CO - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

Photo: Synthia Goode – Ashcroft, CO – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Black Frame PZ600

To be continued …

CLICK TO READ part 2/4 of our road trip to Aspen, CO. 

Impossible Project + the Multi-Talented Josh Goode

June 25, 2012 § Leave a comment

My brother and I were talking the other day and he mentioned that he needed promotional photos for his new website.  Josh is an uber-talented producer, singer/songwriter, musician, composer & arranger (the boy’s a musical genius .. it’s true).  I had taken a photo of him a while back on Impossible’s PX-70 Old Gen film.  He liked the look of instant film and definitely wanted that type of vibe for the images on his website.

Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation Film

Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation Film

The vintage-y look was definitely the right fit.  I told him what might be cool is a series of photos that showcased the wide array of musical abilities he has and some of the equipment he uses.  He liked the idea and we figured out a time to get together …

On the morning of the shoot, I was finishing up a blog post on using Impossible images in a RB67 and knew I needed something to post for the example.  I had used the method before BUT the image I took was of a friend and felt it didn’t quite showcase the RB’s optical abilities.    I cruised over to his place, mentioned the blog post and started off the shoot using the RB …

- Mamiya RB67 + 90mm f/3.8 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Mamiya RB67 + 90mm f/3.8 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – f/5.6 @ 1/30th –

For the rest of the shoot, I used a Polaroid Sonar SX-70, mounted on a tripod if I was indoors.  Most of the indoor images (unless taken by a window) were longer exposures.   I mixed some strobes into one of the pictures (first photo below) but mainly used available light.   You can tell which images were taken in rooms heavily lit with incandescents and which photos were taken by natural light.  When shooting longer exposures indoors, incandescents will cast a yellow-orange hue into the image.   Combined with Impossible’s films, it helps to add a vintage look that’s pleasing to the eye.

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down + AB400(stripbox)&Sb800 flash with small softbox –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel 2/3’s down –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down + ND2 filter –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down –

- Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL -

– Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Exposure wheel down –

I’m pleased with the images that were captured.    I think these are a great start for his website and will help set the right vibe for who he is and what he does.

PLUG:  Josh Goode and his engineering partner, Bradley Prakope, are INCREDIBLE producers.  If you are a musician in the north Texas area and are actively looking for QUALITY people to work with that produce viable music for the masses, these are the guys.  If you are curious about their services please contact Josh at – josh@goodevibesmusic.com

– Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

BUY IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT FILM HERE!

Impossible Project Bumper Sticker: Who wants one?

June 23, 2012 § 2 Comments

Would you like to help promote the use of instant film?  Get with it and slap one of these babies up on your ride!

Impossible Project Bumper Sticker - Help Promote!

Impossible Project Bumper Sticker – Help Promote!

I received some of these today from the Impossible Project (the first batch I got went quickly!).  If you are in the D/FW area and would like one, send a message my way and I’ll be happy to find a way to get one of these to you.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

Dallas Cowboys Stadium + The Impossible Project PX70 & PZ680

June 18, 2012 § 1 Comment

About a month ago, a couple friends of ours (Amy & Ellie) were visiting from Colorado. When my wife and I caught up with them at a bar, Ellie and I started gabbin’ about all things photography (she’s a photog as well). Since I’m usually carrying, I decided to bring the Mamiya RB67 loaded with one frame of old gen PX70 (I had recently read a blog post about this particular technique on TIP’s website). When I started fiddling with it, our conversation segued to the Impossible Project and I got her up to speed with the jist of their products & company. I took a photo that night but had screwed up the loading process (I left a practice photo in the polaroid back and laid the unexposed photo on top – I’m still perplexed as to how I didn’t feel that in the light bag). Needless to say I didn’t get an image BUT it got her interest piqued. She was probably thinking “Why would this guy lug around all this stuff for ONE photo?”

We talked a few days later and she mentioned that she wanted to commission me for a small project. Ellie and her husband Eric are expecting a baby boy in August and he wants to help her decorate. Apparently, Eric is a HUGE Dallas Cowboys fan. So much so, that he was thinking about putting astro-turf in the nursery. When that was vetoed he found a HUGE rug that looked like an aerial view of the field. Now, not that there’s anything wrong with those two suggestions but I think Ellie was looking for another solution to the compromise. 😉 After hearing about the Impossible Project and seeing some of the images, she said she’d rather have prints of some IP film shot at Cowboys Stadium. Sweet! We did a quick search online and found that there were self-guided tours that are offered throughout the year.

The day of the shoot arrived and I packed a bag full o’ cameras & film. I knew that for the exterior images I would probably shoot it with the SX-70 & PX-70 COOL + the occasional ND filter (kudos to Tyler Tyndell for the ND tip) and for the interiors I would alternate between the SX-70 and a Spectra AF w/ PZ680 Color Shade. My lady, Synthia, came with me as well and she brought a Spectra SE with some PZ old gen black frame. Synthia’s finally come around to the ol’ Impossible Project. At first she would jokingly make comments like … “You’re shooting more of that impossibly hard to shoot film .. gah … “. But over the last two months, her interest has increased and she decided to pick up a PZ old generation bag. She was saving the film for an upcoming trip to Colorado but I think we’ll probably be buying a little more before that epic road trip. Oops! On a tangent .. back to the task at hand …

We got to the stadium about 1 o’clock and picked up two of their self-guided tour tickets. I had never been there before and was a little surprised at just how ginormous the stadium was. I’d seen it from The Ballpark in Arlington but I’d never really been near it.

We made our way inside and almost every person that we talked to mentioned something about the cameras we were shooting. “I love y’alls Polaroids!” .. “You can still get film for those?!” … “Wow! Haven’t seen one of those in years” .. “I have one of those in my closet!” .. The love for Polaroid cameras & instant photography never ceases to amaze me.

A few of my favorites …

Cowboys Stadium - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - PX70 COOL

Cowboys Stadium – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – PX70 COOL

Cowboys Stadium - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - PX-70 Cool

Cowboys Stadium – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – PX-70 Cool

Cowboys Stadium - Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680

Cowboys Stadium – Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680

Cowboys Stadium - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - PX70 COOL

Cowboys Stadium – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – PX70 COOL

Cowboys Stadium - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - PX-70 COOL

Cowboys Stadium – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – PX-70 COOL

Cowboys Stadium - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - PX-70 Cool

Cowboys Stadium – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – PX-70 Cool

Cowboys Stadium - Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - PX-70 Cool

Cowboys Stadium – Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – PX-70 Cool

A couple of Synthia’s favorites … I love the black frame impossible photos.

Photo: Synthia Goode - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Old Gen Black Frame -

Photo: Synthia Goode – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Old Gen Black Frame –

Photo: Synthia Goode - Spectra SE - Impossible Project Old Gen Black Frame -

Photo: Synthia Goode – Spectra SE – Impossible Project Old Gen Black Frame –

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

For info on purchasing prints email me at info@goodephotography.biz

To buy your own Impossible Project film click here!

Did you know …

May 3, 2012 § 1 Comment

.. that Nikon is going to pull the plug on selling parts to independent camera repair shops & consumers come July 13, 2012?  

Archinal Camera Repair – Richardson, TX

If independent repair shops don’t cough up ~ $168,000 for tools, Nikon will not sell parts to them any longer.   A very good friend of mine owns Archinal Camera Repair in Richardson, TX.  He’s been in the camera repair business as long as he’s been able to work.   He inherited the business from his father and has worked in this industry his whole life.   We’ve been talking about this Nikon decision for some months since it was announced.  He told me that 80-90% of the repairs that come in for Nikons can be handled in the store.   They do not need to be shipped out in order to be repaired.    Come July, if anything goes wrong with your Nikon camera, you will have to ship it off to one of 23 authorized repair facilities in the US.

Archinal Camera Repair - Richardson, TX

Archinal Camera Repair – Richardson, TX

I completely understand that Nikon is having a hard time financially due to the tsunami in Japan and the flooded plant in Thailand.   It seems the move to stop the sales of parts to the public is strictly to direct profits back to them. The direct impact this is going to have on hundreds if not thousands of repair shops nationwide is huge.  They will be pushing an older generation out of the business because of the restriction of parts sales. For my friend, that means a substantial amount of his business will be gone come July 14th.

There is a petition online at change.org that has collected about 6,000 signatures.   If you have the time,  please click on the link and check it out.  Thanks!

SIGN THE PETITION

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

Impossible Project Film: Keeping it Cool

May 1, 2012 § 1 Comment

One of the challenges I know I’m going to face this summer is keeping Impossible Project film at a decent temperature during the development cycle.   I picked up a PX-70 Old Generation bag a couple of weeks ago and have burned through a few packs of film.   One of the things I’ve read, and Billy has told me, is that Impossible Project film’s colors are sensitive to temperature as it develops.   That poses a little bit of a problem for me when the ideal temperature to develop is in the 65-75 degree range.  I live in Texas.  It is going to be 100+ degrees for at LEAST a couple of months this summer.   From my brief experience with this film, the warmer it is while it’s developing, the warmer the colors seem to be.

I snapped a quick picture of my niece, on my Sonar SX-70, just after she ate the other day.    We were inside our carport, a few feet from direct sunlight and it was probably in the low 80’s.  When this was developing it was probably near 80 in the house as well.

Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation Film

Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation Film

I shot this image at a wedding a couple of weeks ago.   We were in direct sunlight and it was also around 80 degrees outside.    It developed in a box, in my camera case, for the duration of the wedding.

Wedding shot with Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation Film

Billy had mentioned to me that a mutual friend of ours had suggested using an icepack in the camera bag to keep the temperature stable.  It got my wheels turning … Would it work well and would the temperature be in the range I needed it to be?

I grabbed an icepack out of the freezer, placed it in a gallon-sized freezer bag, wrapped it with a couple of paper towels, and THEN wrapped it in an old baby diaper burp rag (it insulates quite well actually).   I put two empty boxes of PX-70 just inside the first layer of the bundle.

I stuck a thermometer inside the bottom box, tucked it down in my bag and waited about 5 minutes.   When I rechecked the temp it was sitting around 65 degrees.

When I checked it after another 5 minutes, it was close to 50 degrees; Waay too cold.  The instructions state; Impossible films are sensitive to temperature: developing below 15 degrees celsius / 59 degrees fahrenheit tend to make pictures too light and low in contrast.   What about the box above it?  Sitting happy at 65-68 degrees.  I can live with that.    Now I am experimenting with this in April/May and have little insight if the temperatures will be able to hold during the summer.  UPDATE:  I did another test the other day and the temperature of the top box held a consistent temperature of 66-70 degrees for 8 hours in the camera bag.

I went to the HEARD Nature Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary last weekend with my wife.   We went walking around and really enjoyed the wildlife out there.   I did try this method of development when I was there.    When this picture was taken it was probably 80 degrees outside but it developed at about 60-65 degrees in my bag.

Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation developed at 60 degrees

Impossible Project PX-70 Old Generation developed at 60-65 degrees

- Del's Burgers - Impossible PX-70 COOL - Shot at 85 but developed at 65 degrees -

– Del’s Burgers – Impossible PX-70 COOL – Shot at 90 but developed at 65-70 degrees –

I think as the summer months increase in temperature, I will be using this method more and more to keep my film COOL and in a stable temperature range during the development stage.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

Interested in Impossible Project film?   If you have a Polaroid camera, I highly recommend picking up some of this stuff to experiment with.   It’s quite a challenge but the results are unlike anything you’ve experienced before .. guaranteed.

BUY SOME FILM AND HELP SUPPORT THIS COMPANY! 

Impossible Project Film. Yes.

May 1, 2012 § 1 Comment

I’ve decided to start blogging about my experience with different types of films and cameras to throw a little pro film love “out there” … a small part of me hopes it drums up more interest in the art of film photography. 😉

My good friend, Billy Baque, has nudged me a few times about making a blog and I’ve never really had the inclination to. That all has changed over the past month.

I regularly browse CraigsList ads in the hopes that I’ll find a good deal on any number of cameras on the ever-growing want list.    About a month ago, a Polaroid Sonar SX-70 popped up for $20.   I was lucky enough to get a hold of the guy before anybody else did and within about an hour I had it in my hands.   Because of my inner-geek, I raced home, set up some studio lights, shot a photo on FP-100C of the SX-70 on a Mamiya RB67, bleached the negative, let it dry, scanned it and then admired the pic with all its bleachy-scanned-goodness.  Why not right?

Sonar SX-70 - Bleached FP-100C Negative Scan

Sonar SX-70 – Bleached FP-100C Negative Scan

Anyhow .. back to the task at hand …

I have known about and seen Impossible Project film for quite some time.   Billy shoots a lot of it in the San Francisco bay area and has been raving over the stuff for months.   Up until last month, the only camera I had that could have used it was an older Polaroid OneStep Flash.  I really didn’t want to test fate and use that for my first experience with Impossible film.   I ordered a few boxes of film from the Impossible peeps and was pleased when it arrived within a couple days at my door (their shipping times are quite fast I’ve found).

The first box I shot was PX-100 Silver Shade and I , for whatever reason, did not read the directions before hand.  The first couple exposures were pretty blown out and then I realized that I needed to crank the light/darken wheel all the way down to get a decent exposure.  I didn’t capture anything that was really good from that first box, but the challenge was something that tugged an inner chord in me.    The best from the batch was from a car show that I went to with a friend of mine.   At this point, my interest was growing, but I hadn’t really seen what all the fuss was about.

Impossible Project PX-100 Silver Shade

Impossible Project PX-100 Silver Shade

I had also picked up two boxes of PX-70 Color Shade (one regular and one NIGO).  I saved those and used them when I visited my friend’s ranch in Texas.   I had learned by this time that Impossible Project films were a little unpredictable and needed to be babied in order to get the results I wanted.

The first image I took with PX-70 Color Shade at the ranch was of a pair of purple coneflowers.  I shot this in the shade about 8:30 in the morning when it was probably 60-65 degrees outside.    I tucked it away in a box and snuck a peek at it after about 2 hours.

Impossible Project PX-70 Color Shade

I experimented with a couple shots in direct sunlight and made the quick realization that the emulsion couldn’t handle it. Later on I read on their website … “Truth be told, the speed (light sensitivity) of this film is not totally where we expected it to be for the average SX 70 camera, and especially in bright summer light, the tendency for overexposed images is high.”

Throughout the rest of the week, I babied what little film I had to shoot and shot the rest of the two packs I had brought with me.    I did notice different variations between the regular pack and the NIGO pack.   The NIGO pack must have had a different developer mixture as it rendered colors differently and there were no undeveloped patches.   Check out some of the results ..

Impossible Project PX-70 NIGO

Impossible Project PX-70 NIGO

Impossible Project PX-70 Color Shade

Impossible Project PX-70 Color Shade

All in all, I am VERY pleased and impressed with this film.   It has a unique,artistic quality that is unparalleled in the world of photography.   There are no other films out there that can create an organic, analog, classic image like the Impossible Project Films do.   They provide a rare, original medium in which to create art.

BUY SOME NOW FOR YOUR SX-70, 600 series or Spectra Polaroid.

-Justin Goode

www.goodephotography.biz

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