A PolaWalk at the Ft. Worth Zoo

November 12, 2012 § 10 Comments

The meet-up at the fair was the inaugural event for the Instant Film Society, an organization I’m helping start that promotes the use, accessibility and education of analog instant photography.  Following the success of the State Fair PolaWalk, we were all anxious to hook up again for another.  The next event was scheduled for November 10th.  The weather up ended being gorgeous and the turnout was phenomenal.

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Softtone Film

On the day of, I packed a Polaroid Sonar SX-70, a SLR680 and a handful of packs of Impossible Project PX-70 COOL & PX-680 CP.  Synthia had her trusty Spectra AF with some Polaroid Softtone film.  We threw in a couple more Polaroid cameras for some friends to borrow, hopped in the car and made our way over to Ft. Worth.

The evening before I had been contacted by one of my cousins, Luke. To my surprise, he told me his family was going to join us at the zoo and needed to know where he could pick up some film.  I mentioned I had a One Step he could borrow and directed him to Urban Outfitters.  He ended picking up a pack of Impossible’s Rainbow Frame film.  Another friend of ours, Amy, joined as well.  She had been keeping up with the blog and was interested in learning more about The Impossible Project and instant film in general.  In fact, they weren’t the only ones who were new to the walk.  While promoting this event, I got connected with a few other photographers online who came and a large group from Brookhaven met up too.  We had more than 20 people there.  It’s really cool that we all met up for the love of instant film.

After we arrived and hooked up with everybody, we started making our way around the zoo.  The images shot were a mix of Impossible Project, expired Polaroid and Fuji instant film.  Enjoy the pics!

Photo: Luke Bolton - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block - Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Luke Bolton – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block – Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Ashley Sierra - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Ashley Sierra – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood - Polaroid 420 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood – Polaroid 420 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Synthia Goode - Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode – Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Ashley Sierra - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Ashley Sierra – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Kathy Tran - Impossible Project PX680 CP - Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Kathy Tran – Impossible Project PX680 CP – Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Luke Bolton - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block - Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Luke Bolton – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block – Polaroid OneStep

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Luke Bolton - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block - Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Luke Bolton – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block – Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Catherine Downes - Polaroid OneStep - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Catherine Downes – Polaroid OneStep – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Catherine Downes - Polaroid OneStep - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Catherine Downes – Polaroid OneStep – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 100 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 100 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 100 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 100 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Ashley Sierra - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Ashley Sierra – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Softtone Film

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Scott Mitchell - Polaroid 180 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid 180 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid 180 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid 180 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Scott Mitchell - Polaroid 180 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid 180 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Impossible Project PX-70 CP - Polaroid SX-70

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Impossible Project PX-70 CP – Polaroid SX-70

Polaroid Spectra - Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid Spectra – Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Impossible Project PX680 - Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Impossible Project PX680 – Polaroid 600 One Step

Some of the group has wandered off at this point and had gone their own way.   We regrouped as many of us as we could and snapped a quick shot about halfway through the afternoon.

PolaWalk at the Ft. Worth Zoo - Polaroid Spectra AF - Polaroid Softtone Film

PolaWalk at the Ft. Worth Zoo – Polaroid Spectra AF – Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Softtone film - Polaroid Spectra AF

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Softtone film – Polaroid Spectra AF

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Impossible Project PX-70 CP - Polaroid SX-70

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Impossible Project PX-70 CP – Polaroid SX-70

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood - Polaroid 420 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood – Polaroid 420 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Kathy Tran - Impossible Project PX680 CP - Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Kathy Tran – Impossible Project PX680 CP – Polaroid 600 One Step

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid Sonar SX-70

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Catherine Downes - Polaroid OneStep - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Catherine Downes – Polaroid OneStep – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Fuji Instax Wide

Throughout the day, we were approached by strangers inquiring about the event and just what all this was about.  Everyone was thrilled that you could still buy instant film, smiled at the sight of the cameras and were glad to know that it was still being produced.  We passed out handfuls of flyers & stickers from Impossible and helped spread the word about all things instant.

The next day I talked with many of the people that joined up with us.  Everyone loved the event and most were already talking about the next.  I could feel the energy & excitement.   One in particular said she spent her Sunday afternoon obsessively looking on Ebay for Polaroid cameras and felt as if somehow she was supposed to stumble upon this hobby.   That’s what this is all about for me.  Spreading the love of instant photography to others and inspiring more people to reach out and try it.  Once you shoot it and feel it .. it’s really hard not to love it.

Want to learn more?  Come to our next PolaWalk on December 15th in Sundance Square.  You can find details here.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

www.instantfilmsociety.com

CLICK HERE TO BUY IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT FILM

Fuji FP-100C Emulsion/Image Transfer

June 27, 2012 § 5 Comments

Fuji FP-100C - Polaroid Land Camera 100 - Polaroid Emulsion/Image Transfer Kit

Fuji FP-100C – Polaroid Land Camera 100 – Polaroid Emulsion/Image Transfer Kit

The wonderful Sandy Hibbard, of Lyric Marketing & Design, hired me again this past week to take photos for a client of hers, Stephanie McAndrew.   Stephanie is a writer/activist who promotes the empowerment of women & children in the states & abroad.  When Sandy first approached me, she mentioned that along with the some of the more traditional headshot images, she also wanted something out of the box for Stephanie’s portrait.  I racked my brain for a ideas and came up with a couple decent ones but never had “it” figured out.

About a week later, I went to The Film Depot in Richardson to pick up some film sleeves for the 120 & FP-100C I’d been shooting.   Now, I’ve been to this place a kajillion times and I always browse through almost everything when I’m there.   For some reason or another, I had never seen the brand-new-in-box Polaroid Emulsion/Image Transfer Kit that was sitting waaaay up high on the shelf.   I asked the owner if I could pull it down to look at it .. she nodded her head.  I grabbed the box and white flakes came floating down all over me.  I took a deep breath, blew the top of the box and a cloud of dust flew through the store.  The owner laughed, smiled and told me that she’d be willing to make a deal with me.   The box said $25 but she’d take $15.  I opened it up, saw that the deal was good and paid the kind lady.  Score!

The week of the Stephanie’s shoot came up and I had been toying around with emulsion lifts/transfers.   It didn’t quite dawn on me until a day or so before the shoot, but I knew that a collage of emulsion transfers would be a really cool fit for Stephanie’s portrait (out of the box? √ ).  We discussed possible locations the day before and decided on using The Heard Wildlife Sanctuary in McKinney.

The shoot was a blast! Stephanie & Sandy were in great spirits the whole time as I took them on a wild goose chase of a photoshoot.   I had been to the Heard before with Synthia and remembered where some of the nicer ‘available light’ locations were.  The only issue was we had to walk about 2-3 miles total to get to all of them (sorry again ladies ..).    About 1/2 way through the shoot, we came to the spot I had planned on using for the collage of emulsion transfers.  I had Stephanie sit on a bench and started snapping away with a Polaroid 100 Land Camera.    I took 6 images in the style of David Hockney and tucked them away in my homemade box to dry.

A day later, once the prints had fully dried, I pulled the materials out of the Polaroid Emulsion/Image Transfer Kit and gathered anything else I needed ..

2 trays (8×10 or larger) to hold water

Thermometer

Timer

Rubber Tongs

Contact Paper

Rubber Brayer (a roller)

Wax Paper & Scissors (not included in kit)

Along with the kit I purchased, I received a step-by-step guide to emulsion transfers.  If you’d like to view a PDF of it CLICK HERE.

The process was pretty simple ..

Trim off edges of photo

I trimmed off the edges of the photos …

Then figured out how much contact paper was needed to cover the back

Then figured out how much contact paper was needed to cover the back

Cut my contact paper so it was about the same size as the print ....

Cut my contact paper so it was about the same size as the print ….

Peeled it apart ...

Peeled it apart …

And placed it on the back of the print to protect it ...

And pressed it firmly it onto the back of the print to shield it from the water …

Once all of the images were trimmed and set up with contact paper, I started heating up some water on the stove.   When the water was 160 degrees I poured it into the one of the trays and filled the other tray of water with tap water.

Set a timer for four minutes ...

Set a timer for four minutes …

Placed the print into HOT water ...

Placed the print into HOT water …

Used tongs to keep the print submerged under water for 4 minutes ...

Used tongs to keep the print submerged under water for 4 minutes …

After four minutes, I moved the print into the COLD water ...

After four minutes, I moved the print into the COLD water …

Pushed the edges of the emulsion towards the center with my thumbs and it eventually slid off ....

Pushed the edges of the emulsion towards the center with my thumbs and it eventually slid off ….

I repeated the process ...

I repeated the process …

*

Moved the prints to the COLD water …

Slid the emulsions off the prints ...

Slid the emulsions off the prints …

At this point, I cut an 8×10 piece of watercolor paper that I had lying around and submerged it in water for a few seconds.  I pulled it out and layed it on an 8×10 piece of glass.  I used the rubber roller to “mount it” to the glass.   Almost time for the transfer …

Put wax paper underneath the emulsion (reverse side should be up)

Put wax paper underneath the emulsion (reverse side should be up)

Pressed it against the watercolor paper ..

Pressed it against the watercolor paper ..

Then used a rubber brayer on top of the wax paper to firmly press the emulsion down ...

Then used a rubber brayer on top of the wax paper to firmly press the emulsion down …

Gently pealed away the wax paper ...

Gently pealed away the wax paper …

Repeat process ...

Repeated the process …

*

*

It was getting there ...

I set it out to dry …

When the piece dried, the watercolor paper wrinkled a bit and little portions of the transferred emulsions were rising up from the paper.  I placed the piece in an 8×10 frame to flatten it but was bothered by the negative space that was surrounding the transferred images.    I’m a stickler.   I went back to the Heard a few days later and took 9 more photos at approximately the same time of day as the first shoot.  The images dried and I transferred them to finish out the piece.

Fuji FP-100 Emulsion / Image Transfer

Fuji FP-100 Emulsion / Image Transfer

NOTE:  If you’re experienced in transfers and have any suggestions/comments to share, I would love to hear from you!

Also, if you like this technique and would like to have a unique image created for you , email or call me!  I’d be happy to create something original for you!

For those interested, I’ve attached a few of my favorite images from this session as well …

Stephanie McAndrew - Writer/Activist

Stephanie McAndrew – Writer/Activist

Stephanie McAndrew - Writer/Activist

Stephanie McAndrew – Writer/Activist

Stephanie McAndrew - Writer/Activist

Stephanie McAndrew – Writer/Activist

Thank you for your time!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

BUY Fuji FP-100C HERE! 

Bleaching FP-100C

May 5, 2012 § 8 Comments

Salvage a negative from FP-100C shot on your Polaroid

Salvage a negative from FP-100C shot on your Polaroid

For those of you unaware, FujiFilm’s FP-100C is peel apart film used in Polaroid cameras and other cameras equipped with a Polaroid back.    I’ve been shooting the stuff for a few years on a Mamiya RB-67 and Polaroid pack film cameras (seen above).  Other than Impossible Project films, Fuji’s peel-apart films are the only other dominate option for instant analogue photography.

I just recently found out how to salvage the negatives from FP-100C.   For years I’ve just peeled off the exposed prints and disposed of the “other part”.  I have been missing out!  Not any more however 😉

My wife and I took a trip to our friend’s ranch a few weeks ago and she shot a lot of FP-100C while we were there.  We saved all of her negatives and stored them in a box once they had all dried.  Side note: I’ve found if you stash the negative away in a dark dry place, you can still salvage it.    If it’s left out in the open sun to dry, exposure will run its course and the negative will be overexposed/washed out.   Anyhow, she took an image of me plinking away with a bb gun on their back porch.   It’s a little dark on the print but I’ll be able to pull out some shadow detail once the negative has been scanned (that’s one of the cool things about this).

FP-100C Print

FP-100C Print

To salvage the negative it’s quite simple actually.    You’ll need:

– 8×10-ish piece of glass

– small paint brush

– container to hold bleach

– rubber gloves

– clips to dry the negative

All you have to do is …

Peel paper off around edges of negative

Peel paper off around edges of negative

Prop the glass up in the sink and run some cold water over it

Prop the glass up in the sink and run some cold water over it

Turn water off and immediately place the negative face down (black side up).  Press it down so it seals itself to the glass.

Turn water off and immediately place the negative face down (black side up). Press down on it so it seals itself to the glass.

Pour a little bit of bleach onto the back of the negative

Pour a little bit of bleach onto the back of the negative

Brush off the black backing of the negative with the paint brush.    Frequently dip the brush back into the container of bleach.

Without getting bleach underneath the negative, brush off the black backing of the negative. Frequently dip the brush back into the container of bleach.

Run cold water over the negative to wash away backing.   Be careful not to get water underneath the negative at this time.

Run cold water over the negative to wash away backing. Be careful not to get water underneath the negative at this time.

Position water to go underneath the negative and pull it off the piece of glass using rubber gloves.

Pull the negative off of the glass using rubber gloves.

Wash the developer goop off of the emulsion.  DO NOT APPLY a lot of pressure otherwise you will wash away part of the emulsion.

Wash the developer goop off of the negative. Be careful to not apply a lot of pressure otherwise you might rub off part of the emulsion.

Clip the negative up to dry and you're all set!

Clip the negative up to dry and you’re all set!

Scanned negative from FP-100C

Scanned negative from FP-100C – white blotches are from where the black backing was not bleached off.

Here are a few other examples:

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan - Discoloration is from bleach leaking onto the front during the wash

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan – Green discoloration is from bleach leaking onto the front during the wash.  The left corner area is an undeveloped patch.

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan - Yellow discoloration is from bleach leaking onto the front during the wash

Bleached Fuji FP-100C Negative Scan – Yellow discoloration is from bleach leaking onto the front during the wash

Thanks for taking the time!

-Justin

Got an old pack film camera sitting around?   You can buy FP-100C here.  Aaaaand just because I love these peeps I gotta mention them again … Impossible Project is selling some of the last sepia toned polaroid peel apart film available.   Buy it here.

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