A PolaWalk at the Ft. Worth Zoo

November 12, 2012 § 10 Comments

The meet-up at the fair was the inaugural event for the Instant Film Society, an organization I’m helping start that promotes the use, accessibility and education of analog instant photography.  Following the success of the State Fair PolaWalk, we were all anxious to hook up again for another.  The next event was scheduled for November 10th.  The weather up ended being gorgeous and the turnout was phenomenal.

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Softtone Film

On the day of, I packed a Polaroid Sonar SX-70, a SLR680 and a handful of packs of Impossible Project PX-70 COOL & PX-680 CP.  Synthia had her trusty Spectra AF with some Polaroid Softtone film.  We threw in a couple more Polaroid cameras for some friends to borrow, hopped in the car and made our way over to Ft. Worth.

The evening before I had been contacted by one of my cousins, Luke. To my surprise, he told me his family was going to join us at the zoo and needed to know where he could pick up some film.  I mentioned I had a One Step he could borrow and directed him to Urban Outfitters.  He ended picking up a pack of Impossible’s Rainbow Frame film.  Another friend of ours, Amy, joined as well.  She had been keeping up with the blog and was interested in learning more about The Impossible Project and instant film in general.  In fact, they weren’t the only ones who were new to the walk.  While promoting this event, I got connected with a few other photographers online who came and a large group from Brookhaven met up too.  We had more than 20 people there.  It’s really cool that we all met up for the love of instant film.

After we arrived and hooked up with everybody, we started making our way around the zoo.  The images shot were a mix of Impossible Project, expired Polaroid and Fuji instant film.  Enjoy the pics!

Photo: Luke Bolton - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block - Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Luke Bolton – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block – Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Ashley Sierra - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Ashley Sierra – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood - Polaroid 420 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood – Polaroid 420 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Synthia Goode - Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode – Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Ashley Sierra - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Ashley Sierra – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Kathy Tran - Impossible Project PX680 CP - Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Kathy Tran – Impossible Project PX680 CP – Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Luke Bolton - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block - Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Luke Bolton – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block – Polaroid OneStep

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Luke Bolton - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block - Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Luke Bolton – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block – Polaroid OneStep

Photo: Catherine Downes - Polaroid OneStep - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Catherine Downes – Polaroid OneStep – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Catherine Downes - Polaroid OneStep - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Catherine Downes – Polaroid OneStep – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid SLR680

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 100 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 100 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch - Polaroid 100 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amy Hirsch – Polaroid 100 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Ashley Sierra - Impossible Project PX-680 COOL - Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Ashley Sierra – Impossible Project PX-680 COOL – Polaroid Cool Cam

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Softtone Film

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Scott Mitchell - Polaroid 180 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid 180 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid 180 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid 180 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Scott Mitchell - Polaroid 180 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid 180 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub - Bronica SQ-A - FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Marc Weintraub – Bronica SQ-A – FujiFilm FP-100C

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Impossible Project PX-70 CP - Polaroid SX-70

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Impossible Project PX-70 CP – Polaroid SX-70

Polaroid Spectra - Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Scott Mitchell – Polaroid Spectra – Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Impossible Project PX680 - Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Impossible Project PX680 – Polaroid 600 One Step

Some of the group has wandered off at this point and had gone their own way.   We regrouped as many of us as we could and snapped a quick shot about halfway through the afternoon.

PolaWalk at the Ft. Worth Zoo - Polaroid Spectra AF - Polaroid Softtone Film

PolaWalk at the Ft. Worth Zoo – Polaroid Spectra AF – Polaroid Softtone Film

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Softtone film - Polaroid Spectra AF

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Softtone film – Polaroid Spectra AF

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Impossible Project PX-70 CP - Polaroid SX-70

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Impossible Project PX-70 CP – Polaroid SX-70

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood - Polaroid 420 Land Camera - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Amanda Fleetwood – Polaroid 420 Land Camera – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Impossible Project PX-680 CP - Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Impossible Project PX-680 CP – Polaroid Sun 660

Photo: Kathy Tran - Impossible Project PX680 CP - Polaroid 600 One Step

Photo: Kathy Tran – Impossible Project PX680 CP – Polaroid 600 One Step

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid Sonar SX-70

PolaWalk at the Zoo - Impossible Project PX-70 COOL - Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Justin Goode – Impossible Project PX-70 COOL – Polaroid Sonar SX-70

Photo: Catherine Downes - Polaroid OneStep - Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Catherine Downes – Polaroid OneStep – Impossible Project PX-680 Color Block

Photo: Laidric Stevenson - Fuji Instax Wide

Photo: Laidric Stevenson – Fuji Instax Wide

Throughout the day, we were approached by strangers inquiring about the event and just what all this was about.  Everyone was thrilled that you could still buy instant film, smiled at the sight of the cameras and were glad to know that it was still being produced.  We passed out handfuls of flyers & stickers from Impossible and helped spread the word about all things instant.

The next day I talked with many of the people that joined up with us.  Everyone loved the event and most were already talking about the next.  I could feel the energy & excitement.   One in particular said she spent her Sunday afternoon obsessively looking on Ebay for Polaroid cameras and felt as if somehow she was supposed to stumble upon this hobby.   That’s what this is all about for me.  Spreading the love of instant photography to others and inspiring more people to reach out and try it.  Once you shoot it and feel it .. it’s really hard not to love it.

Want to learn more?  Come to our next PolaWalk on December 15th in Sundance Square.  You can find details here.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

www.instantfilmsociety.com

CLICK HERE TO BUY IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT FILM

Review: Impossible’s LIFT IT Brush Set

October 22, 2012 § Leave a comment

I’ve recently started using Impossible’s LIFT IT! brush set for emulsion transfers. Included in the set are four brushes, varying in size, which aide in the removal, positioning & manipulation of the gelatinous emulsion during transfers. In the past, I was using regular watercolor brushes to remove the emulsion from the mylar surface of instant images. That had been working OK, but since I’ve gotten these, I’m never turning back …

Impossible Project's LIFT IT!Brush Set

Impossible Project’s LIFT IT Brush Set

I’ve heard, “Aren’t these the same as brushes that I can pick up at Michael’s or Hobby Lobby?” At first, I assumed they might be. Not quite the case. When I would use other brushes, the bristles would flare out and I’d end up using the base of the bristles to push off & remove the emulsion. Sometimes I would end up tearing the emulsion while I was removing it, because invariably I was using the metal/wood portion at the base of the bristles. The LIFT IT brushes are designed well. The brushes that need to stay ridged and/or soft deliver. The #1 brush for instance, stays ridged while you use the soft bristles of the brush to remove the emulsion. This helps the user remove it without the heightened risk of tearing it. When you’re dealing with a gelatinous material, being as careful as you can is key.

Since I’ve started using the LIFT IT kit, I’ve made a handful of transfers for family & friends. I made a couple more this evening for this blog post to walk you through the steps. The steps might vary from person to person. This is one of the methods I use. I used three images to make two emulsion transfers. One will be dried & stowed away in the “another random transfer” file & the other will end up being a card for my grandmother.

Images for emulsion transfers

Images for emulsion transfers

Using a sharp knife, splice the edges of the film ...

Using a sharp knife, splice the edges of the film …

Run the knife around all four sides ...

Run the knife around all four sides …

Run the knife around all four sides ...

Run the knife around all four sides …

Keep going ..

Keep going ..

Carefully peel back the layers ...

Carefully peel back the layers …

Discard the bottom portion ...

Discard the bottom portion …

I repeated the process on the remaining two images ...

I repeated the process on the remaining two images …

The three peeled images

The three peeled images

Pour hot water into a tray/bowl

Pour hot water into a tray/bowl

I submerged the three images ...

I submerged the three images …

Brush #3 was made to shape, distort and to remove contortions after the transfer, however, I found that it also served well as a tool to wipe away the developer residue from the backside of the emulsion.  The brush is super soft and the fine bristles worked really well at this task.

Using brush #3, I gently wiped the developer residue away

Using brush #3, I gently wiped the developer residue away

Using brush #3, I gently wiped the developer residue away

Using brush #3, I gently wiped the developer residue away

Using brush #3, I gently wiped the developer residue away

Using brush #3, I gently wiped the developer residue away

Using brush #1, I began removing the emulsions from the mylar

Using brush #1, I began removing the emulsions from the mylar

Using brush #1, I began removing the emulsions from the mylar

Using brush #1, I began removing the emulsions from the mylar

I gently moved the emulsions into a tray/bowl of cold water

I gently moved the emulsions into a tray/bowl of cold water

Once all three emulsions were in the cold tray ...

Once all three emulsions were in the cold tray …

I slid a piece of card stock under one of the emulsions

I slid a piece of card stock under one of the emulsions

I then placed another emulsion on top of the other to help frame it

I then placed another emulsion on top of the other to help frame it

Once I had maneuvered it around to my liking ...

Once I had maneuvered it around to my liking …

I gently slid a brush under the middle and lifted it out of the water

I gently slid a brush under the middle and lifted it out of the water

At this point, I used brush #4 to brush away some of the creases. After a little bit of brushing the creases grew on me; I decided to leave it alone and let it dry.

For the last emulsion, I slid a card into the water ...

For the last emulsion, I slid a card into the water …

Moved the emulsion on top of the submerged paper ..

Moved the emulsion on top of the submerged paper ..

Positioned it how I liked it using brush #1 & #2 and gently removed it

Positioned it how I liked it using brush #1 & #2 and gently removed it

Positioning these onto paper can be a little difficult. It’s best to use small delicate motions with the brushes to move it around. Once the emulsion is spread out, I’ve found you can position the paper underneath, and use gentle side-to-side motions to carefully make water movement push the image around. It takes a little bit of practice. Once I get the image where I want it, I slide a brush underneath the paper and gently push up from the middle to bring it out of the water.

Using brush #4, I added some tears around the edges

Using brush #4, I added some tears around the edges

Using brush #4, I added some tears around the edges

Using brush #4, I added some tears around the edges

Using brush #4, I added some tears around the edges

Using brush #4, I added some tears around the edges

About halfway through this process, brush #4 was a little gunked up with the gelatinous goo. Nothing a quick dip in cold water couldn’t fix; it was as good as new.

When I was finished transferring the emulsions, I used the soap provided in the LIFT IT kit and thoroughly cleaned the bristles. They were clean within a matter of seconds and I set them aside to dry.

– The Transfers –

Example #1

Example #1

Example #2

Example #2

Should you buy it? Of course. Why? For a couple of reasons .. the main one is they really do work well and if cared for properly, these brushes should last you many, many, many transfers (years!). #2 – Do I really have to say it? You’ll be supporting one of the only instant photography companies by purchasing it. Buying their products empowers them to keep providing us with great analog materials to create art. It’s a no brainer!

Help keep instant alive!

If you have ANY questions whatsoever, please send a message my way. I’m always happy to help in any way that I can.

Thanks for your time!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

CLICK HERE to buy Impossible’s LIFT IT! Brush Set

The “Out of the Blue” exhibit at the Impossible Project NY Gallery Space

October 17, 2012 § Leave a comment

Thursday October 25th, the “Out of the Blue” exhibit is opening at the Impossible Project New York gallery space!  I was chosen, along with 29 other talented photographers, to display our images celebrating what’s become possible with Impossible’s newest films.   I’m grateful and honored to have been selected with the likes of such creative individuals!

If you are in the New York area, please stop by and check it out.  Not just for the unique images on display, but also to meet the incredible people that work there.  The exhibit will be up for roughly 3 months, until Jan 31st, so you’ve got plenty of time!

– CLICK ON FLYER FOR DETAILS – 

Out of the Blue Flyer

Out of the Blue Exhibit – Impossible Project New York

As always, thank you for reading my blog!

– Justin Goode

www.goodephotography.biz

CLICK HERE for more information about the Impossible Project New York Gallery Space

Spreadin’ the love of Impossible Project Film at Brookhaven College

October 5, 2012 § 16 Comments

About a week ago, I got in contact with Daniel Rodrigue, the journalism & photography instructor at Brookhaven College.   He had seen a post about the PolaWalk that I was hosting at the State Fair and after a brief telephone conversation, we decided to meet up.   When we did, he and I instantly clicked.   We’re both like-minded individuals and the passion that we share for instant photography is one in the same.   During our meeting, he asked me if I would mind talking to his students at his Photography 1 class about instant film & The Impossible Project.  After some thought, I quickly agreed and it was decided that I’d meet with them the following Tuesday.

I messaged The Impossible Project and they were ecstatic that I had the opportunity to help spread the word about instant film and would send some promotional material for the students.  I was really excited for the students and also very grateful for the opportunity from Daniel.

I’m not a public speaker.  However, I’ve been inspired to talk a lot about this medium.  It’s moved me in a way that no other facet of photography has.   It’s incredibly unique and the company that provides it, is just as much.

Following my meeting with Daniel and my conversations with TIP, I wrote a three page introduction about the company and its films; history, how to use it, special techniques and finally, closed it with a little bit of motivation to help spread the word.

Tuesday came along and I was fully prepared with everything that was needed.   I had a handful of cameras to show & use, Impossible Project film, an emulsion/lift transfer kit with examples, cork boards filled with many of my favorites Impossible images and finally, the confidence needed to pull this off.   This was my FIRST public speaking event.   I would by lying if I said I wasn’t nervous.   I woke up very early that day and was hyping myself up all morning.   I knew I had the knowledge to give them, but more importantly, I hoped that some of the inspiration I’ve gotten from using instant film would rub off on them.

When I got to Brookhaven, Daniel was all smiles and very excited for his students.   I brought in my box of goodies, gave Daniel a poster from The Impossible Project and started organizing all of the material.  Students eventually started to make their way into class, and I could tell many of them were enthralled with some of the images I brought.   It made me happy and also was a little calming to see the excitement that was brewing.

Ten-thirty rolled around and I began the class.   I started off talking about why I like instant film, how it’s completely different than using digital and the ways it can help improve your skill set.  One of the main reasons I love instant film, is that it forces you to slow down.  When every shot really counts and burning images, like one does with digital isn’t an option, you think about EVERYTHING (light, exposure, composition, the development temperature, etc.)  You inherently become a better shooter because of this.  Doing this day in and day out, with every image you take, increases your awareness of what is needed for a successful image and improves on your ability to take great images.   Slowing down helps you to produce quality images a lot more frequently.

Teaching Brookhaven students about Impossible Project film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching Brookhaven students about Impossible Project film

Teaching Brookhaven students about various Polaroid cameras

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching Brookhaven students about various Polaroid cameras

I had an hour for this portion of the class and I was going to meet back up with the photography club at 3 o’clock to show them how to perform emulsion transfers & lifts.  At this point, I had talked and answered questions for about 20 minutes, shown them various cameras that I use, but I really wanted to get some cameras & film into the hands of these people.  Sometimes seeing & feeling what it’s like to shoot instant film, is what it really takes to push people past the tipping point.   I went over how to shield their images, how to shoot the camera and off they went!  The energy was palpable!

Armed with a handful of Polaroid One Steps, some PX-680 CP and PX600 film, the students ran outside and started snapping away!  Daniel and I raced around, trying to find the groups of budding photographers that were snapping off instant film as if it were going out of style.   Integral film was blazing out of these cameras.  It was a sight to see!  Many of the other students around campus were looking and I’m sure wondering “Why did I not take a photography class? Polaroids?!? ”  Strangers were walking up to Daniel asking him what was going on.  It was greatness!

Enjoy some of the images they took …

 – Students, if you would like credit for the images you took, please email me and describe which one/s are yours and I will add credit (first & last name) to your image – 

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Adriana Salazar

Photo: Jennifer Chevallier

Photo: Jennifer Chevallier

Photo: Brian Finch

Photo: Brian Finch

Some of the images I took of the action …

Unfortunately, it was nearing the end of the hour and the students had to get to their next class.  We found most of them and regrouped for a quick photo.

I asked the students if they would mind if I held onto to some of the photos to scan for a blog post.   All of them wanted to keep them (of course) but I assured them that I would bring them back within a couple of days.    We spread out an assortment of photos that were taken and took a quick snapshot ..

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Happy students!

The bounty of images!

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – The bounty of images!

Photo: Justin Goode - RAWR! The Brookhaven Bear!!

Photo: Justin Goode – RAWR! The Brookhaven Bear!!

Later on in the afternoon, I taught their photography club how to do emulsion transfers & lifts.   I had made a few examples at my house a few days earlier.

Emulsion Transfer Example

Emulsion Transfer Example

Image Lift Example

Image Lift Example

Once everyone had arrived, we arranged some trays in a sink and I started showing them how to perform a transfer.   For most, if not all of them, this was the first time they had seen anything like this.  I really enjoy seeing people’s expressions, when they see the emulsion become detached from the plastic cover of integral film.   Most jaws are usually dropped once the emulsion starts to separate.  It looks like an octopus underwater!  I wave my arms around, with octopus-like motions, or what I think an octopus-like motion looks like ;-), when I describe the process.

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Teaching students how to do an emulsion transfer

Photo: Justin Goode - A student peels apart the negative from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode – A student peels apart the negative from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode - A student separates emulsion from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode – A student separates emulsion from integral film

Photo: Justin Goode - Moving the "goop" from hot to cold water

Photo: Justin Goode – Moving the “goop” from hot to cold water

Photo: Justin Goode - A successful first transfer!

Photo: Justin Goode – A successful first transfer!

Photo: Justin Goode - A handful of emulsion transfers

Photo: Justin Goode – A handful of emulsion transfers drying

After I had finished teaching the photography club, one of the students, Scott Mitchell, asked me if he could take my portrait for an article he was writing.  He was going to pitch it to the school’s newspaper later on in the week.   He wanted an image of me, with an assortment of Polaroids taken in their studio.   I dragged the box of cameras in, arranged them on a prop table and he snapped this pic …

Photo: Scott Patrick Mitchell

Photo: Scott Patrick Mitchell

I had the most amazing time teaching these students.   I wouldn’t have done this, if it hadn’t have been for my enormous love for instant photography.  I want to infect people, like a virus, with the passion that I have for instant film.

A giant TEXAS-SIZED shout out to Impossible for providing such an incredible product.  I can’t express enough, how incredibly happy each of them were during this whole process.   Your film just makes people smile and brings joy into this world.  Instant photography is so special.  I haven’t met ONE person that doesn’t appreciate its value.   THANK YOU for enabling me to give the gift of your product to these students.  I have no doubt that I have impacted and inspired them.  I am forever grateful …

Sincerely,

Justin Goode

www.goodephotography.biz

– If you’d like to buy film for your Polaroid camera from The Impossible Project, CLICK HERE – 

A Very, Very WET #PolaWalk at the Texas State Fair on 9/29

September 30, 2012 § 6 Comments

Phew!  I’m sitting at my desk right now, 3 hours after my arrival back home, and I can’t help but to keep grinning at all of the things that happened today.   What an amazing experience.    I can’t begin to stress how great it was, to see such happy pepole on a day like today.  On any other day, we probably would have been miserable!  The non-stop rain .. the endless, torrential downpour that pummeled the group today … But you know what?  EVERYBODY was smiling.   Not one person was unhappy about making the trek out to the fair to meet fellow instant photographers.    I say it all the time, but it’s incredible the type of people that this medium attracts.

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Spectra SE - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Spectra SE – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

My day began, with knowing that it would be wet … REALLY wet today.   The forecast was 80%-90% rain throughout the duration of the day with thunderstorms likely ALL day.    What do you do, when you’ve organized an event and promoted it for a month.   Do you abandon ship?  No.   You go through with it as planned and hope for the best.   I can’t stress enough, that “the best” did occur.

Synthia and I left the house at noon, so we could make our way down to the Texas State Fair and grab a Fletcher’s corny dog before we hooked up with everybody else.  Parking was fairly easy (plenty of spaces) and of course, there weren’t the usual crowds that normally accompany the fair’s 2nd day. We made our way in and I snapped off a couple of photos as we made our way towards Big Tex.

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Daniel R. and Catherine met up with us first and they were both smiling.   They rain hadn’t affected their moods in the slightest (i wouldn’t have thought so, they are really kind & cool people).   After some chuckles and small talk, a fellow photographer I met online, Richard, made his way towards our group and introduced himself.  He jumped in with both feet; pulled out his cameras, started gabbing photography, it was greatness!  It seemed like he was really happy to be around other instant photographers.    Unfortunately, for whatever reason, he had to split early and didn’t end up hanging out with us.   Hopefully he can make it out to the next event that gets organized.   Before, he left I snapped a quick picture of him with his 680 SLR …

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

At this point, Christian & Elaine showed and were grinning from ear to ear as well.   Christian helped promote this event and it was definitely appreciated.  He mentioned that he had been so excited about this event that he could hardly sleep.  Truth be told, I had been tossing and turning most of the week.  A few minutes later, Jeremy & Amber showed up.  I introduced them to everyone, passed off one of the Spectras I brought for them, and got them up to speed on the ins and outs of the camera.   One of Daniel R’s students arrived, Adriana, and all of us introduced ourselves to her. She walked up holding this super cool pink, black and yellow neon Polaroid Cool Cam.   It looked awesome!  We waited around a little while longer for two more guys that I had met online; Daniel P. & Matthew.   They drove in from Tyler and once they arrived, they were already soaked, but again nothing but smiles.   I handed Daniel a Polaroid Automatic 100 with a few packs of FP-100C that I had promised him and we quickly organized a group photo.

Polaroid Spectra SE - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation Film

Polaroid Spectra SE – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Daniel R. spotted an interesting looking character walking towards a streamliner that was parked near Big Tex and asked him if he could take his photo.   The moment I saw the guy, I knew it was “the voice of Big Tex”.  I ran over there with my camera and once Daniel was done shooting this image on his Instax …

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Fuji Instax Mini

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Fuji Instax Mini

I snapped off a quick triptych on the SX-70 .. .

– CLICK IMAGE FOR LARGER SIZE – 

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

We all snapped off a few more photos, while we waited around a little while longer for any stragglers …

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-100 Old Gen

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-600 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Amber Minnerick - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX600 Old Gen

Photo: Amber Minnerick – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX600 Old Gen

Photo: Christian Oliveria - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Projet PX-70 CP

Photo: Christian Oliveria – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Projet PX-70 CP

Photo: Amber Minnerick - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX600 Old Gen

Photo: Amber Minnerick – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX600 Old Gen

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-100 Old Gen

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-600 Old Gen

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 CP Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 CP Film

Then we started making our way towards The Midway area and commenced burning some film!

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Daniel Poe - Polaroid Automatic 100 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Poe – Polaroid Automatic 100 – Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Poe - Polaroid Automatic 100 - Fuji FP-100C

Photo: Daniel Poe – Polaroid Automatic 100 – Fuji FP-100C

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Spectra SE - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation Film

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Spectra SE – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Amber Minnerick - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Amber Minnerick – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Polaroid Cool Cam 600 - Impossible Project PX-680 Old Gen

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Polaroid Cool Cam 600 – Impossible Project PX-680 Old Gen

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Polaroid Cool Cam 600 - Impossible Project PX-680 Old Gen

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Polaroid Cool Cam 600 – Impossible Project PX-680 Old Gen

Photo: Adriana Salazar - Fuji Instax

Photo: Adriana Salazar – Fuji Instax

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Polaroid SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Amber Minnerick - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Amber Minnerick – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 CP Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 CP Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 CP Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 CP Film

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Spectra SE - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Spectra SE – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Amber Minnerick - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Amber Minnerick – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick - Polaroid Spectra AF - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Jeremy Minnerick – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

The rain was relentless!  It just wouldn’t stop.   I’m still in awe, that all of these people came out in such high spirits, despite the rain.   Nothing was going to stop this group!! Rain?!? Pshaw!! Whatevs!  After a while, we decided to make our way into the Food Court to dry off a little bit, relax and get to know each other a little more.

Photo: Amber Minnerick - Polaroid One Step - Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Amber Minnerick – Polaroid One Step – Impossible Project PX-680 Rainbow Frame

Photo: Catherine Downes - Instagram - Part of the slew of equipment we rolled with ;-)

Photo: Catherine Downes – Instagram – Part of the slew of equipment we rolled with 😉

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Polaroid Spectra 2 - VERY expired Polaroid Spectra film

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid Spectra 2 – VERY expired Polaroid Spectra film

Photo: Synthia Goode - Polaroid Spectra SE - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Synthia Goode – Polaroid Spectra SE – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Christian Oliveira - Polaroid Spectra 2 - VERY expired Polaroid Spectra film

Photo: Christian Oliveira – Polaroid Spectra 2 – VERY expired Polaroid Spectra film

For Synthia and I, this was the first time we had met most of these people.   I’m usually not the type to go out and seek the company of strangers for events, and for that matter, I really don’t like talking to strangers.   It’s funny.  My passion for using instant film is helping me turn a new leaf in my life.  Many of you have never met me, and don’t know that I stutter.  Sometimes it can get the best of me, but most of the time, it’s not that big of a deal.   Sure, it doesn’t define me, but it has shaped me into the person that I am.  For a guy like me, meeting strangers and talking to new people is a thing that I try and avoid most of the time.   When I started thinking about hosting this PolaWalk, I knew that I would killing a few birds with one stone: 1) I’d get an opportunity to “break the mold” so to speak, and get out there and meet strangers and force myself over this hump. 2) I’d get the chance to spread the love of Impossible to other shooters.  And 3) I’d be able to make new friends in the area that share the love that I feel for photography.  All in all, it was a winning idea all around.

Anyhow, at this point Jeremy, Amber, Synthia and Adriana all had to bolt.  So we packed up our things and made our way back outside.   We started walking along and WHOOMFFF!! A huge gust of wind ripped apart my umbrella, haha!  It was hilarious!  Daniel R. snapped a quick pick while everybody was laughing.   Later on, Amber wrote something about it being an UNbrella.  Very fitting Amber …

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid Spectra SE - Spectra Soft Tone Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid Spectra SE – Spectra Soft Tone Film

We headed indoors to the petting zoo.  Walked around a little while and eventually made our way back outside.

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue - Polaroid Spectra SE - Polaroid Spectra Soft Tone Film

Photo: Daniel Rodrigue – Polaroid Spectra SE – Polaroid Spectra Soft Tone Film

Most of us were pretty tired and fairly soaked (COMPLETELY) so we decided to call it a day.   We all parted ways and made our way out of the park.  I snapped a couple of images on the way out, but by this time it really started pouring some heavy rain.   I had no umbrel … UNbrella at this point, so I got even more soaked!  Luckily, I had some plastic bags in my backpack and saved my gear & film from getting completely drenched.

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Photo: Daniel Poe - Polaroid Spectra AF -  Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Photo: Daniel Poe – Polaroid Spectra AF – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Gen

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 - Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Polaroid Sonar SX-70 – Impossible Project PX-70 CP Film

Overall, an incredible experience!  I can’t wait to schedule more of these around the metroplex and help spread the word about the greatness that is Impossible Project film.  If you are interested in learning more about this medium, please get in touch with me.  I’m an open door and would love to help you get into this medium.   There’s nothing better for personal photography.  Even more so, it’s a fantastic medium for the professional photographer.  Offering this sort of “out of the box” photography is giving your clients something you can’t get anywhere else.   There’s only ONE company making integral film.  Get off your butts and support them!  Doing so, gives the gift of “the polaroid” back to this generation and hopefully the next.

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

To buy Impossible Project film, CLICK HERE. 

A PolaWalk at The Texas State Fair!

September 18, 2012 § 1 Comment

– September 29th, 2012 @ 2PM –

– CLICK HERE TO JOIN THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK –

– JOIN THE INSTANT FILM SOCIETY’S FACEBOOK PAGE –

Come to the fair with us wielding your Polaroid!!! If you’ve got an instant camera and would like to join in on the festivities, get in contact with me!

Polaroid Spectra - Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Polaroid Spectra – Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

The fun starts at 2PM sharp!  We’re meeting up at Big Tex.  We’ll introduce ourselves to each other and then once we’ve assimilated a massive crowd of instant photography shooters, we’ll storm the fair!  Not since the heyday of Polaroid has the Texas State Fair seen a group like this!  Integral film will be firing out of our cameras faster than … well as fast as our pocket books will let us 😉

GET OFF YOUR RUMPS AND COME SHOOT SOME POLAROIDS!  If you’ve never shot with a Polaroid before (heaven forbid), and would like to, please please PLEASE send a message my way.  I am more than happy to help anybody & everybody that has an interest in using this medium.  If you’re interested in shooting Impossible Project film with your SX-70, Spectra or 600 series camera, I can help you jump in with both feet!  I will teach you all of the ins and outs of shooting Impossible’s films, or any other instant film for that matter, and will gladly assist you in any way I can, on the day of!

If you’ve been following my blog, you’re probably aware of The Impossible Project.  They are the only providers of integral instant film for old-school Polaroid cameras.  Since their inception a few years ago, they have been working hard at perfecting their product for their customers.   Just today, they announced their newest batch of film, the Color Protection line.  Because of a newly developed anti-opacification molecule, it gives instant photographers the freedom to shoot wherever they like, without having to fret about shielding the image upon ejection.

Now is the PERFECT time to step into the world of instant photography.   With Impossible’s new line of films, the results are more predictable than ever and you can almost shoot this stuff as carefree, as one did with the older line of Polaroid films.

YES.  It does cost money to shoot.  It won’t be like shooting with your grandmother’s Canon 5D mark whatever which bangs out a kajillion digital images.   You have to embrace the unexpected realities and possibilities when you use instant film.   The results ARE WORTH IT.   Instead of a digital file made up of 1’s and 0’s on a SD or CF card, you get a tangible analog print in your hand; a permanent memory of the day.  Is that worth the cost?  Absolutely.   You’ve got the best of both the analog & digital world; an analog print to slap up on your fridge and an image that can be easily scanned for reproductions and to share online.

It’s so worth it!

If you have ANY QUESTIONS whatsoever regarding this event, please send a message to info@goodephotography.biz

I’m hoping we can make this event HUGE!  Please pass the word along to fellow photographers that have an interest in film & instant photography.  We are the lifeline of this medium and must help keep it alive for future generations.

Now, back to the film photographer’s grind (scanning images).  I have to pay for all of this instant film somehow 😉

Cheers!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

To learn more about Impossible’s NEW line of instant film CLICK HERE

A Polaroid Macro 5 SLR + Impossible Project PZ680

September 18, 2012 § 6 Comments

Last weekend, Synthia and I went to the ranch to photograph Erica Perry’s bridal & promo photos.    When we were finished, we headed up to Synthia’s parents house to celebrate her niece’s b-day.   While we were visiting, her mom told us that she had an old 35mm camera at the dentist office that she wanted to give us.   The three of us cruised up the road and rummaged around the attic and found the camera; a Yashica inter-oral macro camera.   The lens has an inner ring flash and is fixed to the body (pretty cool, needs an odd battery).   While we were up there, Synthia’s mom mentioned that they might have an old Polaroid too.   She went searching through some boxes and dug up a Polaroid Macro 5 SLR.   I quickly figured out that this could use Impossible’s Spectra film.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR

The excitement was buzzing through me!  Macros with a Polaroid??? I’d probably seen one of these in the past, but I’d never realized what it could do.    With a SX-70, the closest you can focus is 10 inches.  Being able to focus closer, provides a whole new realm of creativity to dive into.

When I got back home, I searched online and found the Polaroid Macro 5’s manual.  There are 5 different distances in which you can focus the camera; 52, 26, 10, 5 and 3 inches. You press the shutter down 1/2 way and it emits two dots of light from the camera.  As you bring the image into focus, the dots intersect and overlap each other; a dual-light rangefinder. There are two flashes on either side of the lens (which you can toggle on & off separately) and there’s also an external PC port on the camera, so you can slave flashes off-camera.

For those that are going to try any off-camera flash photography, you’ll find the following chart useful.  You should note, that the Polaroid Macro 5 has a fixed shutter speed of 1/50th.   For proper exposures using off-camera flash, you’ll need to use a handheld flash meter to figure out the right output for your strobes/flashes.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR Camera Specifications

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR Camera Specifications

The first image I shot, cliche yes, was of Synthia’s eye.   I wanted to get a feel for just how close this thing could focus.   I set the Macro 5 to focus at its closest distance (3 inches), kept the exposure at neutral with the flashes on, and snapped the photo.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Later on, I went to Archinal Camera to show my friend Robert the newest acquisition.  He’s got a TON of old cameras on a shelf above his desk.   I grabbed an old Kodak camera and snapped another macro for the blog.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Afterwards, I went to my brother’s house and snapped a photo of Edie (my niece).  She was hanging out under the kitchen table.   I set the focus to 26 inches and started rocking back & forth until she was in focus.  She wasn’t too fond of the focusing lights.  When the image developed, I noticed a time stamp on top of the photo.  I pressed the Mode button on the back until “– — —-” showed up, hoping it would turn off that feature.  It did.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ680 Old Generation

What about its off camera flash capabilities??   I set up a Nikon SB-600, set at 1/16th power, about 3 inches away from a dead fly I found.   I figured, why not?  I set the camera to its closest focusing distance (3 inches) and hooked up some Pocket Wizards.  I turned the Macro 5’s internal flashes off and fired a photo.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

As stated in the Macro 5’s manual, “Test exposures may be required to determine the correct location and settings for the auxiliary flash unit for correct exposure”.  That’s definitely the case.   My Sekonic L-358 can only meter up to f/90.  I was guesstimating the right output on the SB-600 and the exposure is overexposed.  Regardless of the outcome of this photo, it’s pretty nice that you CAN use slaved flashes if you want to venture down that path.

One more test shot with slaved flashes.   This time I used a SB-600 & SB-800 and cross lit my Leica M2.  I set the focusing distance to 10 inches and tested the flash output with the L-358.  It was sitting around f/51-57.

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR - Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Polaroid Macro 5 SLR – Impossible Project PZ-680 Old Generation

Phew!  Talk about a tough camera to shoot with off-camera flash!  With a fixed shutter speed of 1/50th and also dealing with an aperture range of f/20 – f/100, it certainly makes it challenging.  Now, I haven’t given up on its capabilities yet, however, I think I’ll save this thing for the next time I’m at the Dallas Arboretum.  I would imagine this thing would be great for flower & insect macros.

If macro photography is your cup of tea, you might be interested in picking up a Polaroid Macro 5 SLR from The Impossible Project here, or you can find them online on Ebay.

Thanks for reading!

-Justin

www.goodephotography.biz

PS – Impossible Project has just announced their newest batch of film.  To learn more about the latest advancements CLICK HERE.